FEAR in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - fear in Mansfield Park
1  It is the habits of wealth that I fear.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV
2  She did not seem to have a thought of fear.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
3  You will have nothing to fear, or to be agitated about.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
4  Go on, my dear Fanny, and without fear; there can be no difficulties worth naming.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
5  Miss Crawford was very right in what she said of you the other day: that you seemed almost as fearful of notice and praise as other women were of neglect.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
6  On the subject of my last, I had actually begun a letter when called away by Tom's illness, but I have now changed my mind, and fear to trust the influence of friends.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
7  Fanny, whether near or from her cousins, whether in the schoolroom, the drawing-room, or the shrubbery, was equally forlorn, finding something to fear in every person and place.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
8  She had probably alienated love by the helplessness and fretfulness of a fearful temper, or been unreasonable in wanting a larger share than any one among so many could deserve.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
9  Nothing could be so gratifying to me as to hear your opinion of it," was his answer; "but I fear there would be some disappointment: you would not find it equal to your present ideas.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
10  Her displeasure, her penetration, and her happiness were all fearful to encounter; and the dependence of having others present when they met was Fanny's only support in looking forward to it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
11  The place became less strange, and the people less formidable; and if there were some amongst them whom she could not cease to fear, she began at least to know their ways, and to catch the best manner of conforming to them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
12  The coachman drove round to a minute; another minute brought down the gentleman; and as the lady had, with a most scrupulous fear of being late, been many minutes seated in the drawing-room, Sir Thomas saw them off in as good time as his own correctly punctual habits required.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
13  The family were not consumptive, and she was more inclined to hope than fear for her cousin, except when she thought of Miss Crawford; but Miss Crawford gave her the idea of being the child of good luck, and to her selfishness and vanity it would be good luck to have Edmund the only son.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
14  Without any display of doing more than the rest, or any fear of doing too much, he was always true to her interests, and considerate of her feelings, trying to make her good qualities understood, and to conquer the diffidence which prevented their being more apparent; giving her advice, consolation, and encouragement.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
15  But she was so wholly unused to confer favours, except on the very poor, so unpractised in removing evils, or bestowing kindnesses among her equals, and so fearful of appearing to elevate herself as a great lady at home, that it took some time to determine that it would not be unbecoming in her to make such a present.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XL
16  To be in the centre of such a circle, loved by so many, and more loved by all than she had ever been before; to feel affection without fear or restraint; to feel herself the equal of those who surrounded her; to be at peace from all mention of the Crawfords, safe from every look which could be fancied a reproach on their account.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
17  She had found a seat, where in excessive trembling she was enduring all these fearful thoughts, while the other three, no longer under any restraint, were giving vent to their feelings of vexation, lamenting over such an unlooked-for premature arrival as a most untoward event, and without mercy wishing poor Sir Thomas had been twice as long on his passage, or were still in Antigua.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX
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