FEEL in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - feel in Pride and Prejudice
1  Having said thus much, I feel no doubt of your secrecy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
2  He began to feel the danger of paying Elizabeth too much attention.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
3  Now," said she, "that this first meeting is over, I feel perfectly easy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 54
4  It is natural that obligation should be felt, and if I could feel gratitude, I would now thank you.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34
5  She had not herself forgotten to feel that the marriage of her sister must bring them more frequently together.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 57
6  I assure you, I feel it exceedingly," said Lady Catherine; "I believe no one feels the loss of friends so much as I do.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
7  The dear Colonel rallied his spirits tolerably till just at last; but Darcy seemed to feel it most acutely, more, I think, than last year.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
8  But I pity her, because she must feel that she has been acting wrong, and because I am very sure that anxiety for her brother is the cause of it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
9  She had spent six weeks with great enjoyment; and the pleasure of being with Charlotte, and the kind attentions she had received, must make her feel the obliged.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
10  She continued in very agitated reflections till the sound of Lady Catherine's carriage made her feel how unequal she was to encounter Charlotte's observation, and hurried her away to her room.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34
11  His attachment excited gratitude, his general character respect; but she could not approve him; nor could she for a moment repent her refusal, or feel the slightest inclination ever to see him again.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
12  My dear Jane, Mr. Collins is a conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man; you know he is, as well as I do; and you must feel, as well as I do, that the woman who married him cannot have a proper way of thinking.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
13  I feel myself called upon, by our relationship, and my situation in life, to condole with you on the grievous affliction you are now suffering under, of which we were yesterday informed by a letter from Hertfordshire.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
14  What Wickham had said of the living was fresh in her memory, and as she recalled his very words, it was impossible not to feel that there was gross duplicity on one side or the other; and, for a few moments, she flattered herself that her wishes did not err.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
15  Elizabeth was prepared to see him in his glory; and she could not help in fancying that in displaying the good proportion of the room, its aspect and its furniture, he addressed himself particularly to her, as if wishing to make her feel what she had lost in refusing him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
16  I need not explain myself farther; and though we know this anxiety to be quite needless, yet if she feels it, it will easily account for her behaviour to me; and so deservedly dear as he is to his sister, whatever anxiety she must feel on his behalf is natural and amiable.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
17  It was reasonable that he should feel he had been wrong; he had liberality, and he had the means of exercising it; and though she would not place herself as his principal inducement, she could, perhaps, believe that remaining partiality for her might assist his endeavours in a cause where her peace of mind must be materially concerned.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
18  She lost all concern for him in finding herself thus selected as the object of such idle and frivolous gallantry; and while she steadily repressed it, could not but feel the reproof contained in his believing, that however long, and for whatever cause, his attentions had been withdrawn, her vanity would be gratified, and her preference secured at any time by their renewal.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
19  Mr. Wickham was the happy man towards whom almost every female eye was turned, and Elizabeth was the happy woman by whom he finally seated himself; and the agreeable manner in which he immediately fell into conversation, though it was only on its being a wet night, made her feel that the commonest, dullest, most threadbare topic might be rendered interesting by the skill of the speaker.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
20  As a clergyman, moreover, I feel it my duty to promote and establish the blessing of peace in all families within the reach of my influence; and on these grounds I flatter myself that my present overtures are highly commendable, and that the circumstance of my being next in the entail of Longbourn estate will be kindly overlooked on your side, and not lead you to reject the offered olive-branch.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13