FRIENDS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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1  My kind friends will not hear of my returning till I am better.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
2  You know my mother's ideas as to the necessity of constant company for her friends.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
3  I am extremely glad that you have such pleasant accounts from our friends at Hunsford.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
4  I assure you, I feel it exceedingly," said Lady Catherine; "I believe no one feels the loss of friends so much as I do.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
5  It is unlucky," said she, after a short pause, "that you should not be able to see your friends before they leave the country.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
6  Mrs. Gardiner was standing a little behind; and on her pausing, he asked her if she would do him the honour of introducing him to her friends.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
7  She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in anything ridiculous.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
8  Yes, indeed, his friends may well rejoice in his having met with one of the very few sensible women who would have accepted him, or have made him happy if they had.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 32
9  Bingley expressed great pleasure in the certainty of seeing Elizabeth again, having still a great deal to say to her, and many inquiries to make after all their Hertfordshire friends.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44
10  It was possible, and sometimes she thought it probable, that his affection might be reanimated, and the influence of his friends successfully combated by the more natural influence of Jane's attractions.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
11  But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
12  The very first sentence conveyed the assurance of their being all settled in London for the winter, and concluded with her brother's regret at not having had time to pay his respects to his friends in Hertfordshire before he left the country.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
13  They had, therefore, many acquaintances in common; and though Wickham had been little there since the death of Darcy's father, it was yet in his power to give her fresher intelligence of her former friends than she had been in the way of procuring.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
14  Jane pictured to herself a happy evening in the society of her two friends, and the attentions of her brother; and Elizabeth thought with pleasure of dancing a great deal with Mr. Wickham, and of seeing a confirmation of everything in Mr. Darcy's look and behaviour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
15  The occurrences of the day were too full of interest to leave Elizabeth much attention for any of these new friends; and she could do nothing but think, and think with wonder, of Mr. Darcy's civility, and, above all, of his wishing her to be acquainted with his sister.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
16  They had been walking about the place with some of their new friends, and were just returning to the inn to dress themselves for dining with the same family, when the sound of a carriage drew them to a window, and they saw a gentleman and a lady in a curricle driving up the street.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44
17  I am sure," she added, "if it was not for such good friends I do not know what would become of her, for she is very ill indeed, and suffers a vast deal, though with the greatest patience in the world, which is always the way with her, for she has, without exception, the sweetest temper I have ever met with.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
18  When the ladies removed after dinner, Elizabeth ran up to her sister, and seeing her well guarded from cold, attended her into the drawing-room, where she was welcomed by her two friends with many professions of pleasure; and Elizabeth had never seen them so agreeable as they were during the hour which passed before the gentlemen appeared.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
19  After an affectionate parting between the friends, Elizabeth was attended to the carriage by Mr. Collins, and as they walked down the garden he was commissioning her with his best respects to all her family, not forgetting his thanks for the kindness he had received at Longbourn in the winter, and his compliments to Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner, though unknown.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
20  She could think of nothing else; and yet whether Bingley's regard had really died away, or were suppressed by his friends' interference; whether he had been aware of Jane's attachment, or whether it had escaped his observation; whatever were the case, though her opinion of him must be materially affected by the difference, her sister's situation remained the same, her peace equally wounded.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24