GARDEN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - garden in Mansfield Park
1  You will have as free a command of the park and gardens as ever.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
2  And there must be your approach, through what is at present the garden.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
3  You must make a new garden at what is now the back of the house; which will be giving it the best aspect in the world, sloping to the south-east.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
4  My uncle's gardener always says the soil here is better than his own, and so it appears from the growth of the laurels and evergreens in general.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
5  If it had not been for that, we should have carried on the garden wall, and made the plantation to shut out the churchyard, just as Dr. Grant has done.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
6  My dear, it is only a beautiful little heath, which that nice old gardener would make me take; but if it is in your way, I will have it in my lap directly.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
7  The meadows beyond what will be the garden, as well as what now is, sweeping round from the lane I stood in to the north-east, that is, to the principal road through the village, must be all laid together, of course; very pretty meadows they are, finely sprinkled with timber.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
8  What animation, both of body and mind, she had derived from watching the advance of that season which cannot, in spite of its capriciousness, be unlovely, and seeing its increasing beauties from the earliest flowers in the warmest divisions of her aunt's garden, to the opening of leaves of her uncle's plantations, and the glory of his woods.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV