GRATITUDE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - gratitude in Pride and Prejudice
1  You refuse to obey the claims of duty, honour, and gratitude.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 56
2  I am not indebted for my present happiness to your eager desire of expressing your gratitude.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 60
3  It is natural that obligation should be felt, and if I could feel gratitude, I would now thank you.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34
4  She expressed her gratitude again, but it was too painful a subject to each, to be dwelt on farther.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 58
5  There is so much of gratitude or vanity in almost every attachment, that it is not safe to leave any to itself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
6  Neither duty, nor honour, nor gratitude," replied Elizabeth, "have any possible claim on me, in the present instance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 56
7  If gratitude and esteem are good foundations of affection, Elizabeth's change of sentiment will be neither improbable nor faulty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
8  Their taking her home, and affording her their personal protection and countenance, is such a sacrifice to her advantage as years of gratitude cannot enough acknowledge.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 49
9  Elizabeth, though expecting no less, thanked him with tears of gratitude; and all three being actuated by one spirit, everything relating to their journey was speedily settled.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
10  She was not equal, however, to much conversation, and when Miss Bingley left them together, could attempt little besides expressions of gratitude for the extraordinary kindness she was treated with.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
11  His attachment excited gratitude, his general character respect; but she could not approve him; nor could she for a moment repent her refusal, or feel the slightest inclination ever to see him again.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
12  Darcy, as well as Elizabeth, really loved them; and they were both ever sensible of the warmest gratitude towards the persons who, by bringing her into Derbyshire, had been the means of uniting them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
13  The promised letter of thanks from Mr. Collins arrived on Tuesday, addressed to their father, and written with all the solemnity of gratitude which a twelvemonth's abode in the family might have prompted.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
14  It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44
15  Believe me, my dear sir, my gratitude is warmly excited by such affectionate attention; and depend upon it, you will speedily receive from me a letter of thanks for this, and for every other mark of your regard during my stay in Hertfordshire.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
16  Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change, since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 58
17  Elizabeth, easy and unaffected, had been listened to with much more pleasure, though not playing half so well; and Mary, at the end of a long concerto, was glad to purchase praise and gratitude by Scotch and Irish airs, at the request of her younger sisters, who, with some of the Lucases, and two or three officers, joined eagerly in dancing at one end of the room.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6