HAPPY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - happy in Mansfield Park
1  Edmund reverted to the harp, and was again very happy in the prospect of hearing her play.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
2  All were attracted at first by the plants or the pheasants, and all dispersed about in happy independence.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
3  She has done no more than what every young woman would do; and I have no doubt of her being extremely happy.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
4  It had, however, been a very happy one to Fanny through four dances, and she was quite grieved to be losing even a quarter of an hour.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
5  A happy party it appeared to her, all interested in one object: cheerful beyond a doubt, for the sound of merriment ascended even to her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
6  Sir Thomas, however, was truly happy in the prospect of an alliance so unquestionably advantageous, and of which he heard nothing but the perfectly good and agreeable.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
7  She will have a companion in Fanny Price, you know, so it will all do very well; and as for Edmund, as he is not here to speak for himself, I will answer for his being most happy to join the party.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
8  Their road was through a pleasant country; and Fanny, whose rides had never been extensive, was soon beyond her knowledge, and was very happy in observing all that was new, and admiring all that was pretty.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
9  You are sorry to leave Mama, my dear little Fanny," said he, "which shows you to be a very good girl; but you must remember that you are with relations and friends, who all love you, and wish to make you happy.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
10  Mrs. Rushworth acknowledged herself very desirous that her son should marry, and declared that of all the young ladies she had ever seen, Miss Bertram seemed, by her amiable qualities and accomplishments, the best adapted to make him happy.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
11  Their eager affection in meeting, their exquisite delight in being together, their hours of happy mirth, and moments of serious conference, may be imagined; as well as the sanguine views and spirits of the boy even to the last, and the misery of the girl when he left her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
12  I shall be most happy to play to you both," said Miss Crawford; "at least as long as you can like to listen: probably much longer, for I dearly love music myself, and where the natural taste is equal the player must always be best off, for she is gratified in more ways than one.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
13  Miss Bertram could now speak with decided information of what she had known nothing about when Mr. Rushworth had asked her opinion; and her spirits were in as happy a flutter as vanity and pride could furnish, when they drove up to the spacious stone steps before the principal entrance.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
14  Mrs. Norris had been talking to her the whole way from Northampton of her wonderful good fortune, and the extraordinary degree of gratitude and good behaviour which it ought to produce, and her consciousness of misery was therefore increased by the idea of its being a wicked thing for her not to be happy.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
15  And she talked and laughed about it with so little caution as to catch the comprehension of Mr. Rushworth and his mother, and expose her sister to the whispered gallantries of her lover, while Mrs. Rushworth spoke with proper smiles and dignity of its being a most happy event to her whenever it took place.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
16  The remaining three, Mrs. Rushworth, Mrs. Norris, and Julia, were still far behind; for Julia, whose happy star no longer prevailed, was obliged to keep by the side of Mrs. Rushworth, and restrain her impatient feet to that lady's slow pace, while her aunt, having fallen in with the housekeeper, who was come out to feed the pheasants, was lingering behind in gossip with her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
17  Under this infatuating principle, counteracted by no real affection for her sister, it was impossible for her to aim at more than the credit of projecting and arranging so expensive a charity; though perhaps she might so little know herself as to walk home to the Parsonage, after this conversation, in the happy belief of being the most liberal-minded sister and aunt in the world.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
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