HOME in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - home in Mansfield Park
1  But I think her present home must do her good.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
2  In their uncle's house they had found a kind home.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
3  Never, my dear; but you are sure of a comfortable home.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
4  Certainly, my home at my uncle's brought me acquainted with a circle of admirals.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
5  After a short pause Sir Thomas added with dignity, "Yes, let her home be in this house."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
6  Mary was satisfied with the Parsonage as a present home, and Henry equally ready to lengthen his visit.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
7  I shall not ride to-morrow, certainly," said Fanny; "I have been out very often lately, and would rather stay at home.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
8  Afraid of everybody, ashamed of herself, and longing for the home she had left, she knew not how to look up, and could scarcely speak to be heard, or without crying.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
9  Sir Thomas found it expedient to go to Antigua himself, for the better arrangement of his affairs, and he took his eldest son with him, in the hope of detaching him from some bad connexions at home.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
10  The Admiral delighted in the boy, Mrs. Crawford doted on the girl; and it was the lady's death which now obliged her protegee, after some months' further trial at her uncle's house, to find another home.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
11  Fanny, with all her faults of ignorance and timidity, was fixed at Mansfield Park, and learning to transfer in its favour much of her attachment to her former home, grew up there not unhappily among her cousins.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
12  I made my bow in form; and as Mrs. Sneyd was surrounded by men, attached myself to one of her daughters, walked by her side all the way home, and made myself as agreeable as I could; the young lady perfectly easy in her manners, and as ready to talk as to listen.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
13  Unfavourable circumstances had suddenly arisen at a moment when he was beginning to turn all his thoughts towards England; and the very great uncertainty in which everything was then involved determined him on sending home his son, and waiting the final arrangement by himself.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
14  The young people were all at home, and sustained their share in the introduction very well, with much good humour, and no embarrassment, at least on the part of the sons, who, at seventeen and sixteen, and tall of their age, had all the grandeur of men in the eyes of their little cousin.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
15  Of the rest she saw nothing: nobody seemed to think of her ever going amongst them again, even for a visit, nobody at home seemed to want her; but William determining, soon after her removal, to be a sailor, was invited to spend a week with his sister in Northamptonshire before he went to sea.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
16  They took their cheerful rides in the fine mornings of April and May; and Fanny either sat at home the whole day with one aunt, or walked beyond her strength at the instigation of the other: Lady Bertram holding exercise to be as unnecessary for everybody as it was unpleasant to herself; and Mrs. Norris, who was walking all day, thinking everybody ought to walk as much.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  Under this infatuating principle, counteracted by no real affection for her sister, it was impossible for her to aim at more than the credit of projecting and arranging so expensive a charity; though perhaps she might so little know herself as to walk home to the Parsonage, after this conversation, in the happy belief of being the most liberal-minded sister and aunt in the world.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.