HOME in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
 Current Search - home in Pride and Prejudice
1  Their reception at home was most kind.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 39
2  They were not welcomed home very cordially by their mother.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
3  We dine at Rosings twice every week, and are never allowed to walk home.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
4  But Jane was to go home with her, and at Longbourn there would be leisure enough for observation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
5  She then ran gaily off, rejoicing as she rambled about, in the hope of being at home again in a day or two.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
6  Her answer, therefore, was not propitious, at least not to Elizabeth's wishes, for she was impatient to get home.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
7  Her home and her housekeeping, her parish and her poultry, and all their dependent concerns, had not yet lost their charms.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
8  She would not listen, therefore, to her daughter's proposal of being carried home; neither did the apothecary, who arrived about the same time, think it at all advisable.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
9  There was novelty in the scheme, and as, with such a mother and such uncompanionable sisters, home could not be faultless, a little change was not unwelcome for its own sake.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 27
10  Elizabeth received them with all the forbearance of civility, and, at the request of the gentlemen, remained at the instrument till her ladyship's carriage was ready to take them all home.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
11  It was necessary to make this circumstance a matter of pleasure, because on such occasions it is the etiquette; but no one was less likely than Mrs. Bennet to find comfort in staying home at any period of her life.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
12  She could think of nothing but of Mr. Wickham, and of what he had told her, all the way home; but there was not time for her even to mention his name as they went, for neither Lydia nor Mr. Collins were once silent.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
13  As they walked home, Elizabeth related to Jane what she had seen pass between the two gentlemen; but though Jane would have defended either or both, had they appeared to be in the wrong, she could no more explain such behaviour than her sister.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
14  Mrs. Collins, seeing that she was really unwell, did not press her to go and as much as possible prevented her husband from pressing her; but Mr. Collins could not conceal his apprehension of Lady Catherine's being rather displeased by her staying at home.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
15  After waiting at home every morning for a fortnight, and inventing every evening a fresh excuse for her, the visitor did at last appear; but the shortness of her stay, and yet more, the alteration of her manner would allow Jane to deceive herself no longer.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
16  His arrival was soon known at the Parsonage; for Mr. Collins was walking the whole morning within view of the lodges opening into Hunsford Lane, in order to have the earliest assurance of it, and after making his bow as the carriage turned into the Park, hurried home with the great intelligence.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
17  We have certainly done our best; and most fortunately having it in our power to introduce you to very superior society, and, from our connection with Rosings, the frequent means of varying the humble home scene, I think we may flatter ourselves that your Hunsford visit cannot have been entirely irksome.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
18  He now seated himself by her, and talked so agreeably of Kent and Hertfordshire, of travelling and staying at home, of new books and music, that Elizabeth had never been half so well entertained in that room before; and they conversed with so much spirit and flow, as to draw the attention of Lady Catherine herself, as well as of Mr. Darcy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
19  The two gentlemen left Rosings the next morning, and Mr. Collins having been in waiting near the lodges, to make them his parting obeisance, was able to bring home the pleasing intelligence, of their appearing in very good health, and in as tolerable spirits as could be expected, after the melancholy scene so lately gone through at Rosings.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
20  Charlotte's first letters were received with a good deal of eagerness; there could not but be curiosity to know how she would speak of her new home, how she would like Lady Catherine, and how happy she would dare pronounce herself to be; though, when the letters were read, Elizabeth felt that Charlotte expressed herself on every point exactly as she might have foreseen.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26