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Quotes of HOPE from Persuasion by Jane Austen

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He had never indulged much hope, he had now none, of ever reading her name in any other page of his favourite work.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 1   Context
She had little hope of success; but Elizabeth, who in the event of such a reverse would be so much more to be pitied than herself, should never, she thought, have reason to reproach her for giving no warning.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 5   Context
The sweet scenes of autumn were for a while put by, unless some tender sonnet, fraught with the apt analogy of the declining year, with declining happiness, and the images of youth and hope, and spring, all gone together, blessed her memory.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 10   Context
This had been a proof of life, however, of service to her sister; and Henrietta, though perfectly incapable of being in the same room with Louisa, was kept, by the agitation of hope and fear, from a return of her own insensibility.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 12   Context
She could not imagine a man more exactly what he ought to be than Mr Elliot; nor did she ever enjoy a sweeter feeling than the hope of seeing him receive the hand of her beloved Anne in Kellynch church, in the course of the following autumn.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 17   Context
It did seem, last autumn, as if there were an attachment between him and Louisa Musgrove; but I hope it may be understood to have worn out on each side equally, and without violence.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 18   Context
Nobody doubts it; and I hope you do not think I am so illiberal as to want every man to have the same objects and pleasures as myself.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 22   Context
All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it), is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 23   Context
Pray be so good as to mention to the other gentlemen that we hope to see your whole party this evening.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 23   Context
I am afraid there had been some mistake; and I wish you particularly to assure Captain Harville and Captain Wentworth, that we hope to see them both.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 23   Context
He had been most warmly attached to her, and had never seen a woman since whom he thought her equal; but, except from some natural sensation of curiosity, he had no desire of meeting her again.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 7   Context
Though condemning her for the past, and considering it with high and unjust resentment, though perfectly careless of her, and though becoming attached to another, still he could not see her suffer, without the desire of giving her relief.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 10   Context
His acquittal was complete, his friendship warmly honoured, a lively interest excited for his friend, and his description of the fine country about Lyme so feelingly attended to by the party, that an earnest desire to see Lyme themselves, and a project for going thither was the consequence.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 11   Context
I cannot produce written proof again, but I can give as authentic oral testimony as you can desire, of what he is now wanting, and what he is now doing.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 21   Context
Miss Carteret was with her mother; consequently it was not reasonable to expect accommodation for all the three Camden Place ladies.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 19   Context
I can satisfy you, perhaps, on points which you would little expect; and as to his marriage, I knew all about it at the time.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 21   Context
Anne found in Mrs Smith the good sense and agreeable manners which she had almost ventured to depend on, and a disposition to converse and be cheerful beyond her expectation.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 17   Context
Anne admired the good acting of the friend, in being able to shew such pleasure as she did, in the expectation and in the actual arrival of the very person whose presence must really be interfering with her prime object.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 22   Context
His bright proud eye spoke the conviction that he was nice; and Anne Elliot was not out of his thoughts, when he more seriously described the woman he should wish to meet with.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 7   Context
I wish Frederick would spread a little more canvass, and bring us home one of these young ladies to Kellynch.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 10   Context
She could only compare Mr Elliot to Lady Russell, in the wish of really comprehending what had passed, and in the degree of concern for what she must have suffered in witnessing it.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 15   Context
You talk of being proud; I am called proud, I know, and I shall not wish to believe myself otherwise; for our pride, if investigated, would have the same object, I have no doubt, though the kind may seem a little different.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 16   Context
I am glad you find Mr Elliot so agreeable, and wish I could be acquainted with him too; but I have my usual luck: I am always out of the way when any thing desirable is going on; always the last of my family to be noticed.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 18   Context
While Admiral Croft was taking this walk with Anne, and expressing his wish of getting Captain Wentworth to Bath, Captain Wentworth was already on his way thither.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 19   Context
Having long had as much money as he could spend, nothing to wish for on the side of avarice or indulgence, he has been gradually learning to pin his happiness upon the consequence he is heir to.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 21   Context
I am afraid there had been some mistake; and I wish you particularly to assure Captain Harville and Captain Wentworth, that we hope to see them both.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 23   Context
His profession was all that could ever make her friends wish that tenderness less, the dread of a future war all that could dim her sunshine.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 24   Context
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