MUSGROVE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Musgrove in Persuasion
1  And I am sure, Sir," said Mrs Musgrove, "it was a lucky day for us, when you were put captain into that ship.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
2  Mr and Mrs Musgrove were a very good sort of people; friendly and hospitable, not much educated, and not at all elegant.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
3  Captain Wentworth made a very early return to Mr Musgrove's civility, and she was all but calling there in the same half hour.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
4  And so then, I suppose," said Mrs Musgrove, in a low voice, as if thinking aloud, "so then he went away to the Laconia, and there he met with our poor boy.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
5  Anne suppressed a smile, and listened kindly, while Mrs Musgrove relieved her heart a little more; and for a few minutes, therefore, could not keep pace with the conversation of the others.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
6  Her feelings made her speak low; and Captain Wentworth, hearing only in part, and probably not having Dick Musgrove at all near his thoughts, looked rather in suspense, and as if waiting for more.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
7  I have not seen one of them to-day, except Mr Musgrove, who just stopped and spoke through the window, but without getting off his horse; and though I told him how ill I was, not one of them have been near me.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
8  It must be a work of time to ascertain that no injury had been done to the spine; but Mr Robinson found nothing to increase alarm, and Charles Musgrove began, consequently, to feel no necessity for longer confinement.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
9  They were soon dining in company together at Mr Musgrove's, for the little boy's state could no longer supply his aunt with a pretence for absenting herself; and this was but the beginning of other dinings and other meetings.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
10  A very few days more, and Captain Wentworth was known to be at Kellynch, and Mr Musgrove had called on him, and come back warm in his praise, and he was engaged with the Crofts to dine at Uppercross, by the end of another week.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
11  The folks of the Great House were to spend the evening of this day at the Cottage; and it being now too late in the year for such visits to be made on foot, the coach was beginning to be listened for, when the youngest Miss Musgrove walked in.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
12  Mr Musgrove was, in a lesser degree, affected likewise; and when they reached the cottage, they were evidently in want, first, of being listened to anew on this subject, and afterwards, of all the relief which cheerful companions could give them.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
13  It had been a great disappointment to Mr Musgrove to find that no earlier day could be fixed, so impatient was he to shew his gratitude, by seeing Captain Wentworth under his own roof, and welcoming him to all that was strongest and best in his cellars.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
14  Mrs Musgrove thinks all her servants so steady, that it would be high treason to call it in question; but I am sure, without exaggeration, that her upper house-maid and laundry-maid, instead of being in their business, are gadding about the village, all day long.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
15  In music she had been always used to feel alone in the world; and Mr and Mrs Musgrove's fond partiality for their own daughters' performance, and total indifference to any other person's, gave her much more pleasure for their sakes, than mortification for her own.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
16  Again, it was Mary's complaint, that Mrs Musgrove was very apt not to give her the precedence that was her due, when they dined at the Great House with other families; and she did not see any reason why she was to be considered so much at home as to lose her place.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
17  He had, in fact, though his sisters were now doing all they could for him, by calling him "poor Richard," been nothing better than a thick-headed, unfeeling, unprofitable Dick Musgrove, who had never done anything to entitle himself to more than the abbreviation of his name, living or dead.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
18  It was certainly carried nearly as far as possible, for they met every morning, and hardly ever spent an evening asunder; but she believed they should not have done so well without the sight of Mr and Mrs Musgrove's respectable forms in the usual places, or without the talking, laughing, and singing of their daughters.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
19  Mary had acquired a little artificial importance, by becoming Mrs Charles Musgrove; but Anne, with an elegance of mind and sweetness of character, which must have placed her high with any people of real understanding, was nobody with either father or sister; her word had no weight, her convenience was always to give way--she was only Anne.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
20  He was to come to breakfast, but not at the Cottage, though that had been proposed at first; but then he had been pressed to come to the Great House instead, and he seemed afraid of being in Mrs Charles Musgrove's way, on account of the child, and therefore, somehow, they hardly knew how, it ended in Charles's being to meet him to breakfast at his father's.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7