STREET in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - street in Persuasion
1  If you look across the street, you will see Admiral Brand coming down and his brother.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
2  Anne found Captain Benwick getting near her, as soon as they were all fairly in the street.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
3  He hoped she might make some amends for the many very plain faces he was continually passing in the streets.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
4  Prettier musings of high-wrought love and eternal constancy, could never have passed along the streets of Bath, than Anne was sporting with from Camden Place to Westgate Buildings.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
5  It was fixed accordingly, that Mrs Clay should be of the party in the carriage; and they had just reached this point, when Anne, as she sat near the window, descried, most decidedly and distinctly, Captain Wentworth walking down the street.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
6  The following morning Anne was out with her friend, and for the first hour, in an incessant and fearful sort of watch for him in vain; but at last, in returning down Pulteney Street, she distinguished him on the right hand pavement at such a distance as to have him in view the greater part of the street.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
7  We are always meeting with some old friend or other; the streets full of them every morning; sure to have plenty of chat; and then we get away from them all, and shut ourselves in our lodgings, and draw in our chairs, and are snug as if we were at Kellynch, ay, or as we used to be even at North Yarmouth and Deal.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
8  When Lady Russell not long afterwards, was entering Bath on a wet afternoon, and driving through the long course of streets from the Old Bridge to Camden Place, amidst the dash of other carriages, the heavy rumble of carts and drays, the bawling of newspapermen, muffin-men and milkmen, and the ceaseless clink of pattens, she made no complaint.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14