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Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - pretty in Persuasion
1  Here are pretty girls enough, I am sure.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
2  Your interest, Sir Walter, is in pretty safe hands.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
3  "I knew pretty well what she was before that day;" said he, smiling.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
4  She is pretty, I think; Anne Elliot; very pretty, when one comes to look at her.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
5  Sir Walter thought much of Mrs Wallis; she was said to be an excessively pretty woman, beautiful.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
6  He did not mean to say that there were no pretty women, but the number of the plain was out of all proportion.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
7  There was nothing less for Lady Russell to do, than to admit that she had been pretty completely wrong, and to take up a new set of opinions and of hopes.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
8  But poor Mrs Clay who, with all her merits, can never have been reckoned tolerably pretty, I really think poor Mrs Clay may be staying here in perfect safety.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
9  She is only nursing Mrs Wallis of Marlborough Buildings; a mere pretty, silly, expensive, fashionable woman, I believe; and of course will have nothing to report but of lace and finery.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
10  He was, at that time, a remarkably fine young man, with a great deal of intelligence, spirit, and brilliancy; and Anne an extremely pretty girl, with gentleness, modesty, taste, and feeling.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
11  Their dress had every advantage, their faces were rather pretty, their spirits extremely good, their manner unembarrassed and pleasant; they were of consequence at home, and favourites abroad.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
12  Captain Harville was no reader; but he had contrived excellent accommodations, and fashioned very pretty shelves, for a tolerable collection of well-bound volumes, the property of Captain Benwick.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
13  She was looking remarkably well; her very regular, very pretty features, having the bloom and freshness of youth restored by the fine wind which had been blowing on her complexion, and by the animation of eye which it had also produced.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
14  She had something to suffer, perhaps, when they came into contact again, in seeing Anne restored to the rights of seniority, and the mistress of a very pretty landaulette; but she had a future to look forward to, of powerful consolation.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
15  It would not be a great match for Henrietta, but Charles has a very fair chance, through the Spicers, of getting something from the Bishop in the course of a year or two; and you will please to remember, that he is the eldest son; whenever my uncle dies, he steps into very pretty property.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
16  Mr Elliot talks unreservedly to Colonel Wallis of his views on you, which said Colonel Wallis, I imagine to be, in himself, a sensible, careful, discerning sort of character; but Colonel Wallis has a very pretty silly wife, to whom he tells things which he had better not, and he repeats it all to her.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
17  So much was pretty soon understood; but till Sir Walter and Elizabeth were walking Mary into the other drawing-room, and regaling themselves with her admiration, Anne could not draw upon Charles's brain for a regular history of their coming, or an explanation of some smiling hints of particular business, which had been ostentatiously dropped by Mary, as well as of some apparent confusion as to whom their party consisted of.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22