CHARLES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Charles in Persuasion
1  Leave little Charles to my care.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
2  I will go and tell Charles, and get ready directly.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
3  I am not more alarmed about little Charles now than he is.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
4  You can make little Charles do anything; he always minds you at a word.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
5  I really think Charles might as well have told his father we would all come.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
6  I mean to go with you, Charles, for I am of no more use at home than you are.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
7  If there is anything disagreeable going on men are always sure to get out of it, and Charles is as bad as any of them.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
8  Mary knew, from Charles's manner of speaking, that he was quite determined on going, and that it would be of no use to teaze him.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
9  She should put it off as long as she could; but was not easy till she had talked Charles into driving her over on an early day, and was in a very animated, comfortable state of imaginary agitation, when she came back.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
10  It must be a work of time to ascertain that no injury had been done to the spine; but Mr Robinson found nothing to increase alarm, and Charles Musgrove began, consequently, to feel no necessity for longer confinement.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
11  I wish you could persuade Mary not to be always fancying herself ill," was Charles's language; and, in an unhappy mood, thus spoke Mary: "I do believe if Charles were to see me dying, he would not think there was anything the matter with me.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
12  There had been music, singing, talking, laughing, all that was most agreeable; charming manners in Captain Wentworth, no shyness or reserve; they seemed all to know each other perfectly, and he was coming the very next morning to shoot with Charles.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
13  And in short, he had looked and said everything with such exquisite grace, that they could assure them all, their heads were both turned by him; and off they ran, quite as full of glee as of love, and apparently more full of Captain Wentworth than of little Charles.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
14  I hope I am as fond of my child as any mother, but I do not know that I am of any more use in the sick-room than Charles, for I cannot be always scolding and teazing the poor child when it is ill; and you saw, this morning, that if I told him to keep quiet, he was sure to begin kicking about.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
15  There was a numerous family; but the only two grown up, excepting Charles, were Henrietta and Louisa, young ladies of nineteen and twenty, who had brought from school at Exeter all the usual stock of accomplishments, and were now like thousands of other young ladies, living to be fashionable, happy, and merry.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
16  Mary had acquired a little artificial importance, by becoming Mrs Charles Musgrove; but Anne, with an elegance of mind and sweetness of character, which must have placed her high with any people of real understanding, was nobody with either father or sister; her word had no weight, her convenience was always to give way--she was only Anne.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
17  He was to come to breakfast, but not at the Cottage, though that had been proposed at first; but then he had been pressed to come to the Great House instead, and he seemed afraid of being in Mrs Charles Musgrove's way, on account of the child, and therefore, somehow, they hardly knew how, it ended in Charles's being to meet him to breakfast at his father's.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
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