HORSE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - horse in Mansfield Park
1  I never see one sit a horse better.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
2  "Fanny must have a horse," was Edmund's only reply.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
3  You should always remember the coachman and horses.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
4  He had three horses of his own, but not one that would carry a woman.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
5  No part of it fatigues me but getting off this horse, I assure you," said she, as she sprang down with his help; "I am very strong.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
6  Soon after the second breakfast, Edmund bade them good-bye for a week, and mounted his horse for Peterborough, and then all were gone.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
7  Fanny was ready and waiting, and Mrs. Norris was beginning to scold her for not being gone, and still no horse was announced, no Edmund appeared.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
8  She could not but consider it as absolutely unnecessary, and even improper, that Fanny should have a regular lady's horse of her own, in the style of her cousins.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
9  He came towards their little circle; but instead of asking her to dance, drew a chair near her, and gave her an account of the present state of a sick horse, and the opinion of the groom, from whom he had just parted.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
10  They had been hunting together, and were in the midst of a good run, and at some distance from Mansfield, when his horse being found to have flung a shoe, Henry Crawford had been obliged to give up, and make the best of his way back.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
11  He was roused from the reverie of retrospection and regret produced by it, by some inquiry from Edmund as to his plans for the next day's hunting; and he found it was as well to be a man of fortune at once with horses and grooms at his command.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
12  When he returned, to understand how Fanny was situated, and perceived its ill effects, there seemed with him but one thing to be done; and that "Fanny must have a horse" was the resolute declaration with which he opposed whatever could be urged by the supineness of his mother, or the economy of his aunt, to make it appear unimportant.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
13  The two sisters were so kind to her, and so pleasant, that Fanny might have enjoyed her visit could she have believed herself not in the way, and could she have foreseen that the weather would certainly clear at the end of the hour, and save her from the shame of having Dr. Grant's carriage and horses out to take her home, with which she was threatened.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
14  She was too indolent even to accept a mother's gratification in witnessing their success and enjoyment at the expense of any personal trouble, and the charge was made over to her sister, who desired nothing better than a post of such honourable representation, and very thoroughly relished the means it afforded her of mixing in society without having horses to hire.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
15  As the horse continued in name, as well as fact, the property of Edmund, Mrs. Norris could tolerate its being for Fanny's use; and had Lady Bertram ever thought about her own objection again, he might have been excused in her eyes for not waiting till Sir Thomas's return in September, for when September came Sir Thomas was still abroad, and without any near prospect of finishing his business.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV