ILLNESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - illness in Mansfield Park
1  I thought little of his illness at first.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
2  He was the better for ever for his illness.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
3  "Dr. Grant is ill," said she, with mock solemnity.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
4  He has been ill ever since he did not eat any of the pheasant today.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
5  But, in general, I can assure you that they are all passed over, and all very ill used.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
6  The error is plain enough," said the less courteous Edmund; "such girls are ill brought up.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
7  Her ill opinion of him was founded chiefly on observations, which, for her cousins' sake, she could scarcely dare mention to their father.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
8  I could very ill spare the time, and you might have saved me the trouble, if you would only have been so good as to let us know you were going out.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
9  On the subject of my last, I had actually begun a letter when called away by Tom's illness, but I have now changed my mind, and fear to trust the influence of friends.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
10  It astonished her that Tom's sisters could be satisfied with remaining in London at such a time, through an illness which had now, under different degrees of danger, lasted several weeks.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
11  There was not only the debility of recent illness to assist: there was also, as she now learnt, nerves much affected, spirits much depressed to calm and raise, and her own imagination added that there must be a mind to be properly guided.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
12  Instead of being soon well enough to follow his friends, as he had then hoped, his disorder increased considerably, and it was not long before he thought so ill of himself as to be as ready as his physician to have a letter despatched to Mansfield.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV
13  She had by no means forgotten the past, and she thought as ill of him as ever; but she felt his powers: he was entertaining; and his manners were so improved, so polite, so seriously and blamelessly polite, that it was impossible not to be civil to him in return.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
14  It will be a bitter pill to her; that is, like other bitter pills, it will have two moments' ill flavour, and then be swallowed and forgotten; for I am not such a coxcomb as to suppose her feelings more lasting than other women's, though I was the object of them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
15  He submitted to believe that Tom's illness had influenced her, only reserving for himself this consoling thought, that considering the many counteractions of opposing habits, she had certainly been more attached to him than could have been expected, and for his sake been more near doing right.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
16  When he returned, to understand how Fanny was situated, and perceived its ill effects, there seemed with him but one thing to be done; and that "Fanny must have a horse" was the resolute declaration with which he opposed whatever could be urged by the supineness of his mother, or the economy of his aunt, to make it appear unimportant.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  This was a great deal better than to have to take up the pen to acquaint her with all the particulars of the Grants' intended journey, for the present intelligence was of a nature to promise occupation for the pen for many days to come, being no less than the dangerous illness of her eldest son, of which they had received notice by express a few hours before.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV
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