ILLNESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - illness in Persuasion
1  I am so ill I can hardly speak.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
2  He would go, though I told him how ill I was.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
3  The Admiral does not seem very ill, and I sincerely hope Bath will do him all the good he wants.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
4  She could not endure the idea of treachery or levity, or anything akin to ill usage between him and his friend.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
5  There can be no doubt of its having been of the greatest service to Dr Shirley, after his illness, last spring twelve-month.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
6  Anne, judging from her own temperament, would have deemed such a domestic hurricane a bad restorative of the nerves, which Louisa's illness must have so greatly shaken.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
7  She had used him ill, deserted and disappointed him; and worse, she had shewn a feebleness of character in doing so, which his own decided, confident temper could not endure.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
8  Yes, I made the best of it; I always do: but I was very far from well at the time; and I do not think I ever was so ill in my life as I have been all this morning: very unfit to be left alone, I am sure.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
9  I have not seen one of them to-day, except Mr Musgrove, who just stopped and spoke through the window, but without getting off his horse; and though I told him how ill I was, not one of them have been near me.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
10  It sometimes happens that a woman is handsomer at twenty-nine than she was ten years before; and, generally speaking, if there has been neither ill health nor anxiety, it is a time of life at which scarcely any charm is lost.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
11  I wish you could persuade Mary not to be always fancying herself ill," was Charles's language; and, in an unhappy mood, thus spoke Mary: "I do believe if Charles were to see me dying, he would not think there was anything the matter with me.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
12  He had not seen Louisa; and was so extremely fearful of any ill consequence to her from an interview, that he did not press for it at all; and, on the contrary, seemed to have a plan of going away for a week or ten days, till her head was stronger.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
13  The two ladies continued to talk, to re-urge the same admitted truths, and enforce them with such examples of the ill effect of a contrary practice as had fallen within their observation, but Anne heard nothing distinctly; it was only a buzz of words in her ear, her mind was in confusion.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
14  I hope I am as fond of my child as any mother, but I do not know that I am of any more use in the sick-room than Charles, for I cannot be always scolding and teazing the poor child when it is ill; and you saw, this morning, that if I told him to keep quiet, he was sure to begin kicking about.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
15  They had been thrown together several weeks; they had been living in the same small family party: since Henrietta's coming away, they must have been depending almost entirely on each other, and Louisa, just recovering from illness, had been in an interesting state, and Captain Benwick was not inconsolable.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
16  The belief of being prudent, and self-denying, principally for his advantage, was her chief consolation, under the misery of a parting, a final parting; and every consolation was required, for she had to encounter all the additional pain of opinions, on his side, totally unconvinced and unbending, and of his feeling himself ill used by so forced a relinquishment.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
17  When the evening was over, Anne could not but be amused at the idea of her coming to Lyme to preach patience and resignation to a young man whom she had never seen before; nor could she help fearing, on more serious reflection, that, like many other great moralists and preachers, she had been eloquent on a point in which her own conduct would ill bear examination.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
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