IMAGINATION in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - imagination in Pride and Prejudice
1  A lively imagination soon settled it all.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
2  You may imagine what I felt and how I acted.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
3  But do not imagine that he is always here so often.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
4  How Wickham and Lydia were to be supported in tolerable independence, she could not imagine.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
5  In Lydia's imagination, a visit to Brighton comprised every possibility of earthly happiness.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
6  I imagine your cousin brought you down with him chiefly for the sake of having someone at his disposal.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
7  A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony, in a moment.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
8  Don't think me angry, however, for I only mean to let you know that I had not imagined such inquiries to be necessary on your side.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
9  Though Mr. Bennet was not imagined to be very rich, he would have been able to do something for him, and his situation must have been benefited by marriage.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
10  Her ladyship seemed pleased with the idea; and you may imagine that I am happy on every occasion to offer those little delicate compliments which are always acceptable to ladies.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
11  She could only imagine, however, at last that she drew his notice because there was something more wrong and reprehensible, according to his ideas of right, than in any other person present.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
12  I only fear that the sort of cautiousness to which you, I imagine, have been alluding, is merely adopted on his visits to his aunt, of whose good opinion and judgement he stands much in awe.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
13  He bore it with noble indifference, and she would have imagined that Bingley had received his sanction to be happy, had she not seen his eyes likewise turned towards Mr. Darcy, with an expression of half-laughing alarm.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 54
14  But now suppose as much as you choose; give a loose rein to your fancy, indulge your imagination in every possible flight which the subject will afford, and unless you believe me actually married, you cannot greatly err.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 60
15  He was directly invited to join their party, but he declined it, observing that he could imagine but two motives for their choosing to walk up and down the room together, with either of which motives his joining them would interfere.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
16  She could not imagine what business he could have in town so soon after his arrival in Hertfordshire; and she began to fear that he might be always flying about from one place to another, and never settled at Netherfield as he ought to be.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
17  They stood for some time without speaking a word; and she began to imagine that their silence was to last through the two dances, and at first was resolved not to break it; till suddenly fancying that it would be the greater punishment to her partner to oblige him to talk, she made some slight observation on the dance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
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