IMAGINE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - imagine in Persuasion
1  She did not imagine that her father had at present an idea of the kind.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
2  She could scarcely imagine a more cheerless situation in itself than Mrs Smith's.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
3  The conclusion of her visit, however, was diversified in a way which she had not at all imagined.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
4  Yes," said Anne, "you tell me nothing which does not accord with what I have known, or could imagine.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
5  "I cannot imagine why they should suppose I should not like a long walk," said Mary, as she went up stairs.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
6  Had she not imagined herself consulting his good, even more than her own, she could hardly have given him up.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
7  One would imagine you had never heard my father speak of her personal misfortunes, though I know you must fifty times.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
8  Twelve years were gone since they had parted, and each presented a somewhat different person from what the other had imagined.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
9  The letter I am looking for was one written by Mr Elliot to him before our marriage, and happened to be saved; why, one can hardly imagine.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
10  He had imagined himself indifferent, when he had only been angry; and he had been unjust to her merits, because he had been a sufferer from them.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
11  She was still in the astonishment and confusion excited by her friend's penetration, unable to imagine how any report of Captain Wentworth could have reached her.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
12  With the prospect of spending at least two months at Uppercross, it was highly incumbent on her to clothe her imagination, her memory, and all her ideas in as much of Uppercross as possible.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
13  She could imagine Mrs Clay to have said, that "now Miss Anne was come, she could not suppose herself at all wanted;" for Elizabeth was replying in a sort of whisper, "That must not be any reason, indeed."
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
14  He was either less disposed for it than Charles had imagined, or he was too shy; and after giving him a week's indulgence, Lady Russell determined him to be unworthy of the interest which he had been beginning to excite.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
15  She could not imagine a man more exactly what he ought to be than Mr Elliot; nor did she ever enjoy a sweeter feeling than the hope of seeing him receive the hand of her beloved Anne in Kellynch church, in the course of the following autumn.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
16  Mr Elliot talks unreservedly to Colonel Wallis of his views on you, which said Colonel Wallis, I imagine to be, in himself, a sensible, careful, discerning sort of character; but Colonel Wallis has a very pretty silly wife, to whom he tells things which he had better not, and he repeats it all to her.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
17  But by coolly giving the reins a better direction herself they happily passed the danger; and by once afterwards judiciously putting out her hand they neither fell into a rut, nor ran foul of a dung-cart; and Anne, with some amusement at their style of driving, which she imagined no bad representation of the general guidance of their affairs, found herself safely deposited by them at the Cottage.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
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