INTELLIGENCE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - intelligence in Mansfield Park
1  With a purer spirit did Fanny rejoice in the intelligence.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
2  I had actually begun folding my letter when Henry walked in, but he brings no intelligence to prevent my sending it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
3  Henry was most happy to make it more intelligible, by beginning at an earlier stage, and explaining very particularly what he had done.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
4  There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
5  The conclusion was scarcely intelligible from increasing fright, for she found that Mr. Crawford, under pretence of receiving the note, was coming towards her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
6  There was no second letter to explain away the first from Miss Crawford; there was no intelligence from Mansfield, though it was now full time for her to hear again from her aunt.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVI
7  ; and the good luck which attended his early examination of ship news the next morning seemed the reward of his ingenuity in finding out such a method of pleasing her, as well as of his dutiful attention to the Admiral, in having for many years taken in the paper esteemed to have the earliest naval intelligence.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
8  She rushed out at an opposite door from the one her uncle was approaching, and was walking up and down the East room in the utmost confusion of contrary feeling, before Sir Thomas's politeness or apologies were over, or he had reached the beginning of the joyful intelligence which his visitor came to communicate.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
9  This was a great deal better than to have to take up the pen to acquaint her with all the particulars of the Grants' intended journey, for the present intelligence was of a nature to promise occupation for the pen for many days to come, being no less than the dangerous illness of her eldest son, of which they had received notice by express a few hours before.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV