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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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1  Her mind was less difficult to develop.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
2  Miss Bingley succeeded no less in the real object of her civility; Mr. Darcy looked up.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
3  Sir William could not have interrupted two people in the room who had less to say for themselves.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
4  His sister was less delicate, and directed her eyes towards Mr. Darcy with a very expressive smile.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
5  Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
6  Mr. Darcy is impatient to see his sister; and, to confess the truth, we are scarcely less eager to meet her again.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
7  Among those who are at all his equals in consequence, he is a very different man from what he is to the less prosperous.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
8  I want to know," said she, with a countenance no less smiling than her sister's, "what you have learnt about Mr. Wickham.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
9  Had the late Mr. Darcy liked me less, his son might have borne with me better; but his father's uncommon attachment to me irritated him, I believe, very early in life.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
10  You would have been less amiable in my eyes had there not been this little unwillingness; but allow me to assure you, that I have your respected mother's permission for this address.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
11  Their eyes were immediately wandering up in the street in quest of the officers, and nothing less than a very smart bonnet indeed, or a really new muslin in a shop window, could recall them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
12  It was necessary to make this circumstance a matter of pleasure, because on such occasions it is the etiquette; but no one was less likely than Mrs. Bennet to find comfort in staying home at any period of her life.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
13  Certain it is, that the living became vacant two years ago, exactly as I was of an age to hold it, and that it was given to another man; and no less certain is it, that I cannot accuse myself of having really done anything to deserve to lose it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
14  Perhaps not the less so from feeling a doubt of my positive happiness had my fair cousin honoured me with her hand; for I have often observed that resignation is never so perfect as when the blessing denied begins to lose somewhat of its value in our estimation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
15  Miss Bingley was engrossed by Mr. Darcy, her sister scarcely less so; and as for Mr. Hurst, by whom Elizabeth sat, he was an indolent man, who lived only to eat, drink, and play at cards; who, when he found her to prefer a plain dish to a ragout, had nothing to say to her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
16  In vain did Elizabeth endeavour to check the rapidity of her mother's words, or persuade her to describe her felicity in a less audible whisper; for, to her inexpressible vexation, she could perceive that the chief of it was overheard by Mr. Darcy, who sat opposite to them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
17  Even Elizabeth might have found some trial of her patience in weather which totally suspended the improvement of her acquaintance with Mr. Wickham; and nothing less than a dance on Tuesday, could have made such a Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday endurable to Kitty and Lydia.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
18  The happiness anticipated by Catherine and Lydia depended less on any single event, or any particular person, for though they each, like Elizabeth, meant to dance half the evening with Mr. Wickham, he was by no means the only partner who could satisfy them, and a ball was, at any rate, a ball.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
19  Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassailed by any attention to herself, she was very little disposed to approve them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
20  This part of his intelligence, though unheard by Lydia, was caught by Elizabeth, and, as it assured her that Darcy was not less answerable for Wickham's absence than if her first surmise had been just, every feeling of displeasure against the former was so sharpened by immediate disappointment, that she could hardly reply with tolerable civility to the polite inquiries which he directly afterwards approached to make.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18