LIKED in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - liked in Pride and Prejudice
1  He is not at all liked in Hertfordshire.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 16
2  Her aunt asked her, smilingly, how she liked it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 43
3  She liked him too little to care for his approbation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 10
4  There was neither in figure nor face any likeness between the ladies.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 29
5  Bingley was sure of being liked wherever he appeared, Darcy was continually giving offense.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 4
6  She approached and saw the likeness of Mr. Wickham, suspended, amongst several other miniatures, over the mantelpiece.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 43
7  She danced next with an officer, and had the refreshment of talking of Wickham, and of hearing that he was universally liked.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 18
8  Had the late Mr. Darcy liked me less, his son might have borne with me better; but his father's uncommon attachment to me irritated him, I believe, very early in life.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 16
9  I beg you would not put it into Lizzy's head to be vexed by his ill-treatment, for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quite a misfortune to be liked by him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 5
10  Elizabeth excused herself as well as she could; said that she had liked him better when they had met in Kent than before, and that she had never seen him so pleasant as this morning.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 43
11  I believe her to be both in a great degree," replied Wickham; "I have not seen her for many years, but I very well remember that I never liked her, and that her manners were dictatorial and insolent.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 16
12  The only pain was in leaving her father, who would certainly miss her, and who, when it came to the point, so little liked her going, that he told her to write to him, and almost promised to answer her letter.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 27
13  However little Mr. Darcy might have liked such an address, he contented himself with coolly replying that he perceived no other alteration than her being rather tanned, no miraculous consequence of travelling in the summer.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 45
14  He looked surprised, displeased, alarmed; but with a moment's recollection and a returning smile, replied, that he had formerly seen him often; and, after observing that he was a very gentlemanlike man, asked her how she had liked him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 41
15  She anticipated what would be felt in the family when her situation became known; she was aware that no one liked him but Jane; and even feared that with the others it was a dislike which not all his fortune and consequence might do away.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 59
16  Colonel Fitzwilliam's occasionally laughing at his stupidity, proved that he was generally different, which her own knowledge of him could not have told her; and as she would liked to have believed this change the effect of love, and the object of that love her friend Eliza, she set herself seriously to work to find it out.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 32
17  It was, moreover, such a promising thing for her younger daughters, as Jane's marrying so greatly must throw them in the way of other rich men; and lastly, it was so pleasant at her time of life to be able to consign her single daughters to the care of their sister, that she might not be obliged to go into company more than she liked.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 18
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