LODGE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - lodge in Pride and Prejudice
1  We were married, you know, at St. Clement's, because Wickham's lodgings were in that parish.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 51
2  Their lodgings were not long a secret, and at length they began to know the officers themselves.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
3  She then took a large house in Edward-street, and has since maintained herself by letting lodgings.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
4  Elizabeth, as they drove along, watched for the first appearance of Pemberley Woods with some perturbation; and when at length they turned in at the lodge, her spirits were in a high flutter.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
5  His arrival was soon known at the Parsonage; for Mr. Collins was walking the whole morning within view of the lodges opening into Hunsford Lane, in order to have the earliest assurance of it, and after making his bow as the carriage turned into the Park, hurried home with the great intelligence.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
6  The two gentlemen left Rosings the next morning, and Mr. Collins having been in waiting near the lodges, to make them his parting obeisance, was able to bring home the pleasing intelligence, of their appearing in very good health, and in as tolerable spirits as could be expected, after the melancholy scene so lately gone through at Rosings.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
7  In Meryton they parted; the two youngest repaired to the lodgings of one of the officers' wives, and Elizabeth continued her walk alone, crossing field after field at a quick pace, jumping over stiles and springing over puddles with impatient activity, and finding herself at last within view of the house, with weary ankles, dirty stockings, and a face glowing with the warmth of exercise.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7