LOVE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - love in Pride and Prejudice
1  There can be no love in all this.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
2  Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
3  So, Lizzy," said he one day, "your sister is crossed in love, I find.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
4  At present I am not in love with Mr. Wickham; no, I certainly am not.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
5  "I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love," said Darcy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
6  There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
7  Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
8  But little had she dared to hope that so much love and eloquence awaited her there.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
9  Miss Bingley sees that her brother is in love with you, and wants him to marry Miss Darcy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
10  They have known her much longer than they have known me; no wonder if they love her better.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
11  A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony, in a moment.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
12  Could she have seen half as much love in Mr. Darcy for herself, she would have ordered her wedding clothes.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
13  But that expression of 'violently in love' is so hackneyed, so doubtful, so indefinite, that it gives me very little idea.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
14  After a week spent in professions of love and schemes of felicity, Mr. Collins was called from his amiable Charlotte by the arrival of Saturday.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
15  You are too sensible a girl, Lizzy, to fall in love merely because you are warned against it; and, therefore, I am not afraid of speaking openly.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
16  When she was only fifteen, there was a man at my brother Gardiner's in town so much in love with her that my sister-in-law was sure he would make her an offer before we came away.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
17  Without supposing them, from what she saw, to be very seriously in love, their preference of each other was plain enough to make her a little uneasy; and she resolved to speak to Elizabeth on the subject before she left Hertfordshire, and represent to her the imprudence of encouraging such an attachment.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
18  All this was acknowledged to Mrs. Gardiner; and after relating the circumstances, she thus went on: "I am now convinced, my dear aunt, that I have never been much in love; for had I really experienced that pure and elevating passion, I should at present detest his very name, and wish him all manner of evil."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
19  A promise of secrecy was of course very dutifully given, but it could not be kept without difficulty; for the curiosity excited by his long absence burst forth in such very direct questions on his return as required some ingenuity to evade, and he was at the same time exercising great self-denial, for he was longing to publish his prosperous love.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
20  Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect or their nearer connection.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20