MARRIAGE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - marriage in Mansfield Park
1  No happiness of son or niece could make her wish the marriage.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
2  The new dress that my uncle was so good as to give me on my cousin's marriage.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
3  The Admiral hated marriage, and thought it never pardonable in a young man of independent fortune.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
4  I pay very little regard," said Mrs. Grant, "to what any young person says on the subject of marriage.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
5  Well, she went on to say that what remained now to be done was to bring about a marriage between them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
6  To know Fanny to be sought in marriage by a man of fortune, raised her, therefore, very much in her opinion.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
7  It was the natural result of the conduct of each party, and such as a very imprudent marriage almost always produces.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
8  He only conditioned that the marriage should not take place before his return, which he was again looking eagerly forward to.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
9  Had she accepted him as she ought, they might now have been on the point of marriage, and Henry would have been too happy and too busy to want any other object.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
10  To such feelings delay, even the delay of much preparation, would have been an evil, and Mr. Rushworth could hardly be more impatient for the marriage than herself.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
11  Mr. Rushworth had no difficulty in procuring a divorce; and so ended a marriage contracted under such circumstances as to make any better end the effect of good luck not to be reckoned on.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
12  Would he have deserved more, there can be no doubt that more would have been obtained, especially when that marriage had taken place, which would have given him the assistance of her conscience in subduing her first inclination, and brought them very often together.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
13  Such was the state of affairs in the month of July; and Fanny had just reached her eighteenth year, when the society of the village received an addition in the brother and sister of Mrs. Grant, a Mr. and Miss Crawford, the children of her mother by a second marriage.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
14  Her disposition was naturally easy and indolent, like Lady Bertram's; and a situation of similar affluence and do-nothingness would have been much more suited to her capacity than the exertions and self-denials of the one which her imprudent marriage had placed her in.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIX
15  As children, their sister had been always very fond of them; but, as her own marriage had been soon followed by the death of their common parent, which left them to the care of a brother of their father, of whom Mrs. Grant knew nothing, she had scarcely seen them since.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
16  He felt that he ought not to have allowed the marriage; that his daughter's sentiments had been sufficiently known to him to render him culpable in authorising it; that in so doing he had sacrificed the right to the expedient, and been governed by motives of selfishness and worldly wisdom.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
17  After half a moment's pause: "And I should have been very much surprised had either of my daughters, on receiving a proposal of marriage at any time which might carry with it only half the eligibility of this, immediately and peremptorily, and without paying my opinion or my regard the compliment of any consultation, put a decided negative on it."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
18  Being now in her twenty-first year, Maria Bertram was beginning to think matrimony a duty; and as a marriage with Mr. Rushworth would give her the enjoyment of a larger income than her father's, as well as ensure her the house in town, which was now a prime object, it became, by the same rule of moral obligation, her evident duty to marry Mr. Rushworth if she could.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
19  Such and such-like were the reasonings of Sir Thomas, happy to escape the embarrassing evils of a rupture, the wonder, the reflections, the reproach that must attend it; happy to secure a marriage which would bring him such an addition of respectability and influence, and very happy to think anything of his daughter's disposition that was most favourable for the purpose.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
20  She is a cold-hearted, vain woman, who has married entirely from convenience, and though evidently unhappy in her marriage, places her disappointment not to faults of judgment, or temper, or disproportion of age, but to her being, after all, less affluent than many of her acquaintance, especially than her sister, Lady Stornaway, and is the determined supporter of everything mercenary and ambitious, provided it be only mercenary and ambitious enough.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV