MEANLY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
Buy the book from Amazon
 Current Search - meanly in Pride and Prejudice
1  I do not mean to say that a woman may not be settled too near her family.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 32
2  She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 1
3  Not that I mean to find fault with you, for such things I know are all chance in this world.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 13
4  Never, since reading Jane's second letter, had she entertained a hope of Wickham's meaning to marry her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 46
5  Conjectures as to the meaning of it, rapid and wild, hurried into her brain; but she was satisfied with none.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 51
6  While she spoke, Wickham looked as if scarcely knowing whether to rejoice over her words, or to distrust their meaning.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 41
7  There was not much in the question, nor in the preceding remark; but there was a look and a manner which gave them meaning.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 44
8  Elizabeth disdained the appearance of noticing this civil reflection, but its meaning did not escape, nor was it likely to conciliate her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 34
9  I do not mean, however, to assert that we can be justified in devoting too much of our time to music, for there are certainly other things to be attended to.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 18
10  She then read the first sentence aloud, which comprised the information of their having just resolved to follow their brother to town directly, and of their meaning to dine in Grosvenor Street, where Mr. Hurst had a house.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 21
11  He had certainly formed such a plan, and without meaning that it should affect his endeavour to separate him from Miss Bennet, it is probable that it might add something to his lively concern for the welfare of his friend.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 45
12  At that moment, Sir William Lucas appeared close to them, meaning to pass through the set to the other side of the room; but on perceiving Mr. Darcy, he stopped with a bow of superior courtesy to compliment him on his dancing and his partner.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 18
13  She could not think of Darcy's leaving Kent without remembering that his cousin was to go with him; but Colonel Fitzwilliam had made it clear that he had no intentions at all, and agreeable as he was, she did not mean to be unhappy about him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 34
14  She longed to see Mrs. Phillips, the Lucases, and all their other neighbours, and to hear herself called "Mrs. Wickham" by each of them; and in the mean time, she went after dinner to show her ring, and boast of being married, to Mrs. Hill and the two housemaids.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 51
15  I am not now to learn," replied Mr. Collins, with a formal wave of the hand, "that it is usual with young ladies to reject the addresses of the man whom they secretly mean to accept, when he first applies for their favour; and that sometimes the refusal is repeated a second, or even a third time.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 19
16  They were rather handsome, had been educated in one of the first private seminaries in town, had a fortune of twenty thousand pounds, were in the habit of spending more than they ought, and of associating with people of rank, and were therefore in every respect entitled to think well of themselves, and meanly of others.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 4
17  In this perturbed state of mind, with thoughts that could rest on nothing, she walked on; but it would not do; in half a minute the letter was unfolded again, and collecting herself as well as she could, she again began the mortifying perusal of all that related to Wickham, and commanded herself so far as to examine the meaning of every sentence.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 36
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.