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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - men in Mansfield Park
1  Post-captains may be very good sort of men, but they do not belong to us.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
2  You can have been personally acquainted with very few of a set of men you condemn so conclusively.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
3  But there certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world as there are pretty women to deserve them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
4  Indolence and love of ease; a want of all laudable ambition, of taste for good company, or of inclination to take the trouble of being agreeable, which make men clergymen.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
5  The men appeared to her all coarse, the women all pert, everybody underbred; and she gave as little contentment as she received from introductions either to old or new acquaintance.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XL
6  Sir Thomas said no more; but when they sat down to table the eyes of the two young men assured him that the subject might be gently touched again, when the ladies withdrew, with more success.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
7  The Admiral hates trouble, and scorns asking favours; and there are so many young men's claims to be attended to in the same way, that a friendship and energy, not very determined, is easily put by.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
8  She had none of Fanny's delicacy of taste, of mind, of feeling; she saw Nature, inanimate Nature, with little observation; her attention was all for men and women, her talents for the light and lively.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
9  She acknowledged, however, that the Mr. Bertrams were very fine young men, that two such young men were not often seen together even in London, and that their manners, particularly those of the eldest, were very good.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
10  I could name, at this moment, at least six young men within six miles of us, who are wild to be admitted into our company, and there are one or two that would not disgrace us: I should not be afraid to trust either of the Olivers or Charles Maddox.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
11  I made my bow in form; and as Mrs. Sneyd was surrounded by men, attached myself to one of her daughters, walked by her side all the way home, and made myself as agreeable as I could; the young lady perfectly easy in her manners, and as ready to talk as to listen.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
12  The young people were all at home, and sustained their share in the introduction very well, with much good humour, and no embarrassment, at least on the part of the sons, who, at seventeen and sixteen, and tall of their age, had all the grandeur of men in the eyes of their little cousin.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
13  "We miss our two young men," was Sir Thomas's observation on both the first and second day, as they formed their very reduced circle after dinner; and in consideration of Fanny's swimming eyes, nothing more was said on the first day than to drink their good health; but on the second it led to something farther.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
14  Tom had gone from London with a party of young men to Newmarket, where a neglected fall and a good deal of drinking had brought on a fever; and when the party broke up, being unable to move, had been left by himself at the house of one of these young men to the comforts of sickness and solitude, and the attendance only of servants.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV
15  "If poor Sir Thomas were fated never to return, it would be peculiarly consoling to see their dear Maria well married," she very often thought; always when they were in the company of men of fortune, and particularly on the introduction of a young man who had recently succeeded to one of the largest estates and finest places in the country.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV