MORTIFIED in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - mortified in Mansfield Park
1  It would be mortifying her severely.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
2  We had better put an end to this most mortifying conference.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
3  I dined twice in Wimpole Street, and might have been there oftener, but it is mortifying to be with Rushworth as a brother.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV
4  He joined her within five minutes after Julia's exit; and though she made the best of the story, he was evidently mortified and displeased in no common degree.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
5  There was no positive ill-nature in Maria or Julia; and though Fanny was often mortified by their treatment of her, she thought too lowly of her own claims to feel injured by it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
6  His going, though only eight miles, will be an unwelcome contraction of our family circle; but I should have been deeply mortified if any son of mine could reconcile himself to doing less.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
7  Sir Thomas would have been deeply mortified by a suspicion of half that his daughters felt on the subject of his return, and would hardly have found consolation in a knowledge of the interest it excited in the breast of another young lady.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
8  Her elder cousins mortified her by reflections on her size, and abashed her by noticing her shyness: Miss Lee wondered at her ignorance, and the maid-servants sneered at her clothes; and when to these sorrows was added the idea of the brothers and sisters among whom she had always been important as playfellow, instructress, and nurse, the despondence that sunk her little heart was severe.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II