MORTIFIED in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - mortified in Pride and Prejudice
1  To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
2  When she came to that part of the letter in which her family were mentioned in terms of such mortifying, yet merited reproach, her sense of shame was severe.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
3  Consoled by this resolution, she was the better able to bear her husband's incivility; though it was very mortifying to know that her neighbours might all see Mr. Bingley, in consequence of it, before they did.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
4  The hall, the dining-room, and all its furniture, were examined and praised; and his commendation of everything would have touched Mrs. Bennet's heart, but for the mortifying supposition of his viewing it all as his own future property.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
5  Her father had most cruelly mortified her, by what he said of Mr. Darcy's indifference, and she could do nothing but wonder at such a want of penetration, or fear that perhaps, instead of his seeing too little, she might have fancied too much.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 57
6  Mary was obliged to mix more with the world, but she could still moralize over every morning visit; and as she was no longer mortified by comparisons between her sisters' beauty and her own, it was suspected by her father that she submitted to the change without much reluctance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
7  Miss Bingley was very deeply mortified by Darcy's marriage; but as she thought it advisable to retain the right of visiting at Pemberley, she dropt all her resentment; was fonder than ever of Georgiana, almost as attentive to Darcy as heretofore, and paid off every arrear of civility to Elizabeth.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
8  In this perturbed state of mind, with thoughts that could rest on nothing, she walked on; but it would not do; in half a minute the letter was unfolded again, and collecting herself as well as she could, she again began the mortifying perusal of all that related to Wickham, and commanded herself so far as to examine the meaning of every sentence.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36