NATURE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - nature in Mansfield Park
1  No, hers is not a cruel nature.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
2  You have given us an amusing sketch, and human nature cannot say it was not so.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
3  "For everything of that nature I will be answerable," said Tom, in a decided tone.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
4  The instinct of nature was soon satisfied, and Mrs. Price's attachment had no other source.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIX
5  You need not hurry when the object is only to prevent my saying a bon mot, for there is not the least wit in my nature.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
6  Could I have sent a few happy lines, they should not have been wanting, but nothing of that nature was ever in my power.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV
7  Fanny found that it was not to be, and in the modesty of her nature immediately felt that she had been unreasonable in expecting it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
8  Everything that a considerate parent ought to feel was advanced for her use; and everything that an affectionate mother must feel in promoting her children's enjoyment was attributed to her nature.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
9  Till that happened, they continued to talk of Miss Crawford alone, and how she had attached him, and how delightful nature had made her, and how excellent she would have been, had she fallen into good hands earlier.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
10  And when farther pressed, had added, that in her opinion their dispositions were so totally dissimilar as to make mutual affection incompatible; and that they were unfitted for each other by nature, education, and habit.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
11  At first Miss Crawford and her companion made the circuit of the field, which was not small, at a foot's pace; then, at her apparent suggestion, they rose into a canter; and to Fanny's timid nature it was most astonishing to see how well she sat.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
12  They often stopt with the same sentiment and taste, leaning against the wall, some minutes, to look and admire; and considering he was not Edmund, Fanny could not but allow that he was sufficiently open to the charms of nature, and very well able to express his admiration.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLII
13  She was a little surprised that he could spend so many hours with Miss Crawford, and not see more of the sort of fault which he had already observed, and of which she was almost always reminded by a something of the same nature whenever she was in her company; but so it was.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
14  Experience might have hoped more for any young people so circumstanced, and impartiality would not have denied to Miss Crawford's nature that participation of the general nature of women which would lead her to adopt the opinions of the man she loved and respected as her own.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
15  The Miss Bertrams were now fully established among the belles of the neighbourhood; and as they joined to beauty and brilliant acquirements a manner naturally easy, and carefully formed to general civility and obligingness, they possessed its favour as well as its admiration.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
16  Fanny, meanwhile, vexed with herself for not having been as motionless as she was speechless, and grieved to the heart to see Edmund's arrangements, was trying by everything in the power of her modest, gentle nature, to repulse Mr. Crawford, and avoid both his looks and inquiries; and he, unrepulsable, was persisting in both.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
17  At last the scene was over, and Fanny forced herself to add her praise to the compliments each was giving the other; and when again alone and able to recall the whole, she was inclined to believe their performance would, indeed, have such nature and feeling in it as must ensure their credit, and make it a very suffering exhibition to herself.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
18  It often grieved her to the heart to think of the contrast between them; to think that where nature had made so little difference, circumstances should have made so much, and that her mother, as handsome as Lady Bertram, and some years her junior, should have an appearance so much more worn and faded, so comfortless, so slatternly, so shabby.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLII
19  This was a great deal better than to have to take up the pen to acquaint her with all the particulars of the Grants' intended journey, for the present intelligence was of a nature to promise occupation for the pen for many days to come, being no less than the dangerous illness of her eldest son, of which they had received notice by express a few hours before.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV
20  He is a most extraordinary young man, and whatever be the event, you must feel that you have created an attachment of no common character; though, young as you are, and little acquainted with the transient, varying, unsteady nature of love, as it generally exists, you cannot be struck as I am with all that is wonderful in a perseverance of this sort against discouragement.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII