NATURE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - nature in Persuasion
1  No, no, it is not man's nature.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
2  But there is nothing at all of that nature in the letter.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
3  They were people whom her heart turned to very naturally.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
4  Charles, in his real concern and good nature, would go home with her; there was no preventing him.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
5  A speedy cure must not be hoped, but everything was going on as well as the nature of the case admitted.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
6  I will not allow it to be more man's nature than woman's to be inconstant and forget those they do love, or have loved.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
7  Man is more robust than woman, but he is not longer lived; which exactly explains my view of the nature of their attachments.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
8  I wish nature had made such hearts as yours more common, but I have lived three-and-twenty years in the world, and have seen none like it.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
9  She in the overflowing spirits of her recovery, repeats it all to her nurse; and the nurse knowing my acquaintance with you, very naturally brings it all to me.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
10  She was actually forced to exert herself to meet Lady Russell with anything like the appearance of equal solicitude, on topics which had by nature the first claim on her.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
11  No second attachment, the only thoroughly natural, happy, and sufficient cure, at her time of life, had been possible to the nice tone of her mind, the fastidiousness of her taste, in the small limits of the society around them.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
12  Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial; but generally speaking, it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber: it is selfishness and impatience rather than generosity and fortitude, that one hears of.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
13  Hers is a line for seeing human nature; and she has a fund of good sense and observation, which, as a companion, make her infinitely superior to thousands of those who having only received 'the best education in the world,' know nothing worth attending to.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
14  I have had all my own little concerns to arrange, books and music to divide, and all my trunks to repack, from not having understood in time what was intended as to the waggons: and one thing I have had to do, Mary, of a more trying nature: going to almost every house in the parish, as a sort of take-leave.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
15  With regard to Charles Hayter, she had delicacy which must be pained by any lightness of conduct in a well-meaning young woman, and a heart to sympathize in any of the sufferings it occasioned; but if Henrietta found herself mistaken in the nature of her feelings, the alternation could not be understood too soon.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
16  A submissive spirit might be patient, a strong understanding would supply resolution, but here was something more; here was that elasticity of mind, that disposition to be comforted, that power of turning readily from evil to good, and of finding employment which carried her out of herself, which was from nature alone.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
17  While Captains Wentworth and Harville led the talk on one side of the room, and by recurring to former days, supplied anecdotes in abundance to occupy and entertain the others, it fell to Anne's lot to be placed rather apart with Captain Benwick; and a very good impulse of her nature obliged her to begin an acquaintance with him.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
18  In Lady Russell's view, it was perfectly natural that Mr Elliot, at a mature time of life, should feel it a most desirable object, and what would very generally recommend him among all sensible people, to be on good terms with the head of his family; the simplest process in the world of time upon a head naturally clear, and only erring in the heyday of youth.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
19  The first heedless scheme had been to go in the morning and return at night; but to this Mr Musgrove, for the sake of his horses, would not consent; and when it came to be rationally considered, a day in the middle of November would not leave much time for seeing a new place, after deducting seven hours, as the nature of the country required, for going and returning.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
20  Elizabeth arm in arm with Miss Carteret, and looking on the broad back of the dowager Viscountess Dalrymple before her, had nothing to wish for which did not seem within her reach; and Anne--but it would be an insult to the nature of Anne's felicity, to draw any comparison between it and her sister's; the origin of one all selfish vanity, of the other all generous attachment.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20