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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - parent in Mansfield Park
1  She could not respect her parents as she had hoped.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIX
2  Delicacy to her parents made her careful not to betray such a preference of her uncle's house.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
3  Their own inclinations ascertained, there were no difficulties behind, no drawback of poverty or parent.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
4  Sir Thomas, poor Sir Thomas, a parent, and conscious of errors in his own conduct as a parent, was the longest to suffer.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
5  The advantage or disadvantage of your family, of your parents, your brothers and sisters, never seems to have had a moment's share in your thoughts on this occasion.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
6  Everything that a considerate parent ought to feel was advanced for her use; and everything that an affectionate mother must feel in promoting her children's enjoyment was attributed to her nature.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
7  As children, their sister had been always very fond of them; but, as her own marriage had been soon followed by the death of their common parent, which left them to the care of a brother of their father, of whom Mrs. Grant knew nothing, she had scarcely seen them since.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
8  Sir Thomas's sending away his son seemed to her so like a parent's care, under the influence of a foreboding of evil to himself, that she could not help feeling dreadful presentiments; and as the long evenings of autumn came on, was so terribly haunted by these ideas, in the sad solitariness of her cottage, as to be obliged to take daily refuge in the dining-room of the Park.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
9  Sir Thomas's parental solicitude and high sense of honour and decorum, Edmund's upright principles, unsuspicious temper, and genuine strength of feeling, made her think it scarcely possible for them to support life and reason under such disgrace; and it appeared to her that, as far as this world alone was concerned, the greatest blessing to every one of kindred with Mrs. Rushworth would be instant annihilation.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVI