POLITICS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - politics in Mansfield Park
1  You have politics, of course; and it would be too bad to plague you with the names of people and parties that fill up my time.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIII
2  Sir Thomas, politely bowing, replied, "It is the only way, sir, in which I could not wish you established as a permanent neighbour; but I hope, and believe, that Edmund will occupy his own house at Thornton Lacey."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
3  She had by no means forgotten the past, and she thought as ill of him as ever; but she felt his powers: he was entertaining; and his manners were so improved, so polite, so seriously and blamelessly polite, that it was impossible not to be civil to him in return.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
4  Sir Thomas listened most politely, but found much to offend his ideas of decorum, and confirm his ill-opinion of Mr. Yates's habits of thinking, from the beginning to the end of the story; and when it was over, could give him no other assurance of sympathy than what a slight bow conveyed.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX
5  Miss Crawford, on walking up with her brother to spend the evening at Mansfield Park, heard the good news; and though seeming to have no concern in the affair beyond politeness, and to have vented all her feelings in a quiet congratulation, heard it with an attention not so easily satisfied.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
6  She rushed out at an opposite door from the one her uncle was approaching, and was walking up and down the East room in the utmost confusion of contrary feeling, before Sir Thomas's politeness or apologies were over, or he had reached the beginning of the joyful intelligence which his visitor came to communicate.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
7  The politeness which she had been brought up to practise as a duty made it impossible for her to escape; while the want of that higher species of self-command, that just consideration of others, that knowledge of her own heart, that principle of right, which had not formed any essential part of her education, made her miserable under it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
8  Her praise was warm, and he received it as she could wish, joining in it as far as discretion, and politeness, and slowness of speech would allow, and certainly appearing to greater advantage on the subject than his lady did soon afterwards, when Mary, perceiving her on a sofa very near, turned round before she began to dance, to compliment her on Miss Price's looks.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII