PRIDE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - pride in Pride and Prejudice
1  It was all pride and insolence.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
2  Everybody is disgusted with his pride.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
3  Mr. Collins was also in the same state of angry pride.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
4  Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
5  His pride," said Miss Lucas, "does not offend me so much as pride often does, because there is an excuse for it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
6  It is wonderful," replied Wickham, "for almost all his actions may be traced to pride; and pride had often been his best friend.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
7  Her manners were pronounced to be very bad indeed, a mixture of pride and impertinence; she had no conversation, no style, no beauty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
8  He thought too well of himself to comprehend on what motives his cousin could refuse him; and though his pride was hurt, he suffered in no other way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
9  He spoke well; but there were feelings besides those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the subject of tenderness than of pride.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34
10  He generously imputed the whole to his mistaken pride, and confessed that he had before thought it beneath him to lay his private actions open to the world.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
11  His pride, in that direction, may be of service, if not to himself, to many others, for it must only deter him from such foul misconduct as I have suffered by.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
12  If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
13  They had nothing to accuse him of but pride; pride he probably had, and if not, it would certainly be imputed by the inhabitants of a small market-town where the family did not visit.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44
14  Mr. Gardiner, whose manners were very easy and pleasant, encouraged her communicativeness by his questions and remarks; Mrs. Reynolds, either by pride or attachment, had evidently great pleasure in talking of her master and his sister.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
15  This was a stroke of civility for which she was quite unprepared; and she could hardly suppress a smile at his being now seeking the acquaintance of some of those very people against whom his pride had revolted in his offer to herself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
16  Lydia's being settled in the North, just when she had expected most pleasure and pride in her company, for she had by no means given up her plan of their residing in Hertfordshire, was a severe disappointment; and, besides, it was such a pity that Lydia should be taken from a regiment where she was acquainted with everybody, and had so many favourites.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
17  A fortunate chance had recommended him to Lady Catherine de Bourgh when the living of Hunsford was vacant; and the respect which he felt for her high rank, and his veneration for her as his patroness, mingling with a very good opinion of himself, of his authority as a clergyman, and his right as a rector, made him altogether a mixture of pride and obsequiousness, self-importance and humility.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
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