PRINCIPAL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - principal in Persuasion
1  We were principally in town, living in very good style.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
2  Miss Elliot, surrounded by her cousins, and the principal object of Colonel Wallis's gallantry, was quite contented.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
3  Well, it would serve to cure him of an absurd practice of never asking a question at an inn, which he had adopted, when quite a young man, on the principal of its being very ungenteel to be curious.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
4  I do not think any young woman has a right to make a choice that may be disagreeable and inconvenient to the principal part of her family, and be giving bad connections to those who have not been used to them.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
5  It was curious, that having just left you behind me in Bath, my first and principal acquaintance on marrying should be your cousin; and that, through him, I should be continually hearing of your father and sister.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
6  She had never found it so difficult to listen to him, though nothing could exceed his solicitude and care, and though his subjects were principally such as were wont to be always interesting: praise, warm, just, and discriminating, of Lady Russell, and insinuations highly rational against Mrs Clay.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
7  The belief of being prudent, and self-denying, principally for his advantage, was her chief consolation, under the misery of a parting, a final parting; and every consolation was required, for she had to encounter all the additional pain of opinions, on his side, totally unconvinced and unbending, and of his feeling himself ill used by so forced a relinquishment.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4