PROSPECTS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - prospects in Pride and Prejudice
1  Elizabeth, after slightly surveying it, went to a window to enjoy its prospect.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
2  You have a sweet room here, Mr. Bingley, and a charming prospect over the gravel walk.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
3  The prospect of such delights was very cheering, and they parted in mutual good spirits.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
4  The prospect of the Netherfield ball was extremely agreeable to every female of the family.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
5  Elizabeth honestly and heartily expressed her delight in the prospect of their relationship.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 55
6  But the gloom of Lydia's prospect was shortly cleared away; for she received an invitation from Mrs. Forster, the wife of the colonel of the regiment, to accompany her to Brighton.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
7  Mr. Collins's present circumstances made it a most eligible match for their daughter, to whom they could give little fortune; and his prospects of future wealth were exceedingly fair.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
8  But of all the views which his garden, or which the country or kingdom could boast, none were to be compared with the prospect of Rosings, afforded by an opening in the trees that bordered the park nearly opposite the front of his house.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
9  But Elizabeth had now recollected herself, and making a strong effort for it, was able to assure with tolerable firmness that the prospect of their relationship was highly grateful to her, and that she wished her all imaginable happiness.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
10  Every object in the next day's journey was new and interesting to Elizabeth; and her spirits were in a state of enjoyment; for she had seen her sister looking so well as to banish all fear for her health, and the prospect of her northern tour was a constant source of delight.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
11  The first mentioned was, that, regardless of the sentiments of either, I had detached Mr. Bingley from your sister, and the other, that I had, in defiance of various claims, in defiance of honour and humanity, ruined the immediate prosperity and blasted the prospects of Mr. Wickham.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
12  Every park has its beauty and its prospects; and Elizabeth saw much to be pleased with, though she could not be in such raptures as Mr. Collins expected the scene to inspire, and was but slightly affected by his enumeration of the windows in front of the house, and his relation of what the glazing altogether had originally cost Sir Lewis de Bourgh.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
13  But Elizabeth was not formed for ill-humour; and though every prospect of her own was destroyed for the evening, it could not dwell long on her spirits; and having told all her griefs to Charlotte Lucas, whom she had not seen for a week, she was soon able to make a voluntary transition to the oddities of her cousin, and to point him out to her particular notice.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
14  Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect or their nearer connection.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20