REGRET in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - regret in Pride and Prejudice
1  Such squeamish youths as cannot bear to be connected with a little absurdity are not worth a regret.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
2  He expressed no regret for what he had done which satisfied her; his style was not penitent, but haughty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
3  She endeavoured to persuade herself that she did not regret it; but she could no longer be blind to Miss Bingley's inattention.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
4  His regard for her was quite imaginary; and the possibility of her deserving her mother's reproach prevented his feeling any regret.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
5  In her own past behaviour, there was a constant source of vexation and regret; and in the unhappy defects of her family, a subject of yet heavier chagrin.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
6  But here, by carrying with me one ceaseless source of regret in my sister's absence, I may reasonably hope to have all my expectations of pleasure realised.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 42
7  He joined them on their entering the town, and attended them to their aunt's where his regret and vexation, and the concern of everybody, was well talked over.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
8  Be that as it may, she saw him go with regret; and in this early example of what Lydia's infamy must produce, found additional anguish as she reflected on that wretched business.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
9  No one but Mrs. Bennet regretted that their stay would be so short; and she made the most of the time by visiting about with her daughter, and having very frequent parties at home.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 51
10  She was even sensible of some pleasure, though mixed with regret, on finding how steadfastly both she and her uncle had been persuaded that affection and confidence subsisted between Mr. Darcy and herself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
11  My watchfulness has been effectual; and though I certainly should be a more interesting object to all my acquaintances were I distractedly in love with him, I cannot say that I regret my comparative insignificance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
12  We are not on friendly terms, and it always gives me pain to meet him, but I have no reason for avoiding him but what I might proclaim before all the world, a sense of very great ill-usage, and most painful regrets at his being what he is.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
13  The very first sentence conveyed the assurance of their being all settled in London for the winter, and concluded with her brother's regret at not having had time to pay his respects to his friends in Hertfordshire before he left the country.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
14  He observed to her, at a moment when the others were talking together, and in a tone which had something of real regret, that it "was a very long time since he had had the pleasure of seeing her;" and, before she could reply, he added, "It is above eight months."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44
15  His character sunk on every review of it; and as a punishment for him, as well as a possible advantage to Jane, she seriously hoped he might really soon marry Mr. Darcy's sister, as by Wickham's account, she would make him abundantly regret what he had thrown away.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
16  While thus engaged, Elizabeth had a fair opportunity of deciding whether she most feared or wished for the appearance of Mr. Darcy, by the feelings which prevailed on his entering the room; and then, though but a moment before she had believed her wishes to predominate, she began to regret that he came.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 45
17  The next was in these words: "I do not pretend to regret anything I shall leave in Hertfordshire, except your society, my dearest friend; but we will hope, at some future period, to enjoy many returns of that delightful intercourse we have known, and in the meanwhile may lessen the pain of separation by a very frequent and most unreserved correspondence."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
18  Mrs. Bennet, to whose apartment they all repaired, after a few minutes' conversation together, received them exactly as might be expected; with tears and lamentations of regret, invectives against the villainous conduct of Wickham, and complaints of her own sufferings and ill-usage; blaming everybody but the person to whose ill-judging indulgence the errors of her daughter must principally be owing.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47