SILENT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - silent in Mansfield Park
1  Mr. Rushworth could be silent no longer.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX
2  The journey was likely to be a silent one.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVI
3  "We have not been so silent all the time," replied his mother.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
4  Fanny was silent; but not from being convinced that there might not be a remedy found for some of these evils.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
5  They had talked, and they had been silent; he had reasoned, she had ridiculed; and they had parted at last with mutual vexation.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
6  When he and Crawford walked into the drawing-room, his mother and Fanny were sitting as intently and silently at work as if there were nothing else to care for.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
7  After repeating this, Edmund was so much affected that Fanny, watching him with silent, but most tender concern, was almost sorry that the subject had been entered on at all.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
8  He was surprised; but after a few moments' silent consideration of her, replied in a calmer, graver tone, and as if the candid result of conviction, "I believe you are right."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
9  After this speech the two girls sat many minutes silent, each thoughtful: Fanny meditating on the different sorts of friendship in the world, Mary on something of less philosophic tendency.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
10  Fanny estranged from him, silent and reserved, was an unnatural state of things; a state which he must break through, and which he could easily learn to think she was wanting him to break through.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
11  It was a beautiful evening, mild and still, and the drive was as pleasant as the serenity of Nature could make it; but when Mrs. Norris ceased speaking, it was altogether a silent drive to those within.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
12  Fanny would rather have been silent; but being obliged to speak, she could not forbear, in justice to the aunt she loved best, from saying something in which the words "my aunt Norris" were distinguishable.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
13  Henry Crawford's chair was the first to be given a direction towards them, and he sat silently observing them for a few minutes; himself, in the meanwhile, observed by Sir Thomas, who was standing in chat with Dr. Grant.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
14  I am perfectly persuaded that the tempers had better be unlike: I mean unlike in the flow of the spirits, in the manners, in the inclination for much or little company, in the propensity to talk or to be silent, to be grave or to be gay.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
15  A very cordial meeting passed between him and Edmund; and with the exception of Fanny, the pleasure was general; and even to her there might be some advantage in his presence, since every addition to the party must rather forward her favourite indulgence of being suffered to sit silent and unattended to.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
16  The two cousins walked home together; and, except in the immediate discussion of this engagement, which Edmund spoke of with the warmest satisfaction, as so particularly desirable for her in the intimacy which he saw with so much pleasure established, it was a silent walk; for having finished that subject, he grew thoughtful and indisposed for any other.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII