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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - single in Pride and Prejudice
1  Almost as soon as I entered the house, I singled you out as the companion of my future life.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
2  She was very wrong in singling me out as she did; I can safely say that every advance to intimacy began on her side.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
3  It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
4  The whole party were in hopes of a letter from Mr. Bennet the next morning, but the post came in without bringing a single line from him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
5  It was not known that Wickham had a single relationship with whom he kept up any connection, and it was certain that he had no near one living.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
6  The happiness anticipated by Catherine and Lydia depended less on any single event, or any particular person, for though they each, like Elizabeth, meant to dance half the evening with Mr. Wickham, he was by no means the only partner who could satisfy them, and a ball was, at any rate, a ball.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
7  It was, moreover, such a promising thing for her younger daughters, as Jane's marrying so greatly must throw them in the way of other rich men; and lastly, it was so pleasant at her time of life to be able to consign her single daughters to the care of their sister, that she might not be obliged to go into company more than she liked.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18