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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - support in Pride and Prejudice
1  How Wickham and Lydia were to be supported in tolerable independence, she could not imagine.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
2  She knew not how to support herself, and from actual weakness sat down and cried for half-an-hour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34
3  He had some intention, he added, of studying law, and I must be aware that the interest of one thousand pounds would be a very insufficient support therein.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
4  It originated in Mrs. Gardiner, who, fatigued by the exercise of the morning, found Elizabeth's arm inadequate to her support, and consequently preferred her husband's.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
5  Their first object was her sister; and she was more grieved than astonished to hear, in reply to her minute inquiries, that though Jane always struggled to support her spirits, there were periods of dejection.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 27
6  I joined them unexpectedly a day or two before the intended elopement, and then Georgiana, unable to support the idea of grieving and offending a brother whom she almost looked up to as a father, acknowledged the whole to me.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
7  On his quitting the room she sat down, unable to support herself, and looking so miserably ill, that it was impossible for Darcy to leave her, or to refrain from saying, in a tone of gentleness and commiseration, "Let me call your maid."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
8  It had always been evident to her that such an income as theirs, under the direction of two persons so extravagant in their wants, and heedless of the future, must be very insufficient to their support; and whenever they changed their quarters, either Jane or herself were sure of being applied to for some little assistance towards discharging their bills.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61