TEARS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - tears in Pride and Prejudice
1  I do, I do like him," she replied, with tears in her eyes, "I love him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 59
2  Kitty was the only one who shed tears; but she did weep from vexation and envy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
3  She burst into tears as she alluded to it, and for a few minutes could not speak another word.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
4  Jane ran to her uncle and aunt, and welcomed and thanked them both, with alternate smiles and tears.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
5  Elizabeth, as she affectionately embraced her, whilst tears filled the eyes of both, lost not a moment in asking whether anything had been heard of the fugitives.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
6  It does seem, and it is most shocking indeed," replied Elizabeth, with tears in her eyes, "that a sister's sense of decency and virtue in such a point should admit of doubt.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
7  Elizabeth, though expecting no less, thanked him with tears of gratitude; and all three being actuated by one spirit, everything relating to their journey was speedily settled.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
8  The agitation and tears which the subject occasioned, brought on a headache; and it grew so much worse towards the evening, that, added to her unwillingness to see Mr. Darcy, it determined her not to attend her cousins to Rosings, where they were engaged to drink tea.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
9  Mrs. Bennet, to whose apartment they all repaired, after a few minutes' conversation together, received them exactly as might be expected; with tears and lamentations of regret, invectives against the villainous conduct of Wickham, and complaints of her own sufferings and ill-usage; blaming everybody but the person to whose ill-judging indulgence the errors of her daughter must principally be owing.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47