TERMS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - terms in Pride and Prejudice
1  With the Gardiners, they were always on the most intimate terms.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
2  And though he exclaimed at the term, she found that it had been pretty much the case.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 58
3  There was just such an informality in the terms of the bequest as to give me no hope from law.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
4  And he had spoken in such terms of Elizabeth as to leave Georgiana without the power of finding her otherwise than lovely and amiable.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 45
5  When she came to that part of the letter in which her family were mentioned in terms of such mortifying, yet merited reproach, her sense of shame was severe.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
6  His former acquaintances had been numerous; but since he had been in the militia, it did not appear that he was on terms of particular friendship with any of them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
7  He absolutely started, and for a moment seemed immovable from surprise; but shortly recovering himself, advanced towards the party, and spoke to Elizabeth, if not in terms of perfect composure, at least of perfect civility.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
8  We are not on friendly terms, and it always gives me pain to meet him, but I have no reason for avoiding him but what I might proclaim before all the world, a sense of very great ill-usage, and most painful regrets at his being what he is.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
9  In terms of grateful acknowledgment for the kindness of his brother, though expressed most concisely, he then delivered on paper his perfect approbation of all that was done, and his willingness to fulfil the engagements that had been made for him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
10  Mrs. Bennet could not give her consent or speak her approbation in terms warm enough to satisfy her feelings, though she talked to Bingley of nothing else for half an hour; and when Mr. Bennet joined them at supper, his voice and manner plainly showed how really happy he was.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 55
11  Had Lydia's marriage been concluded on the most honourable terms, it was not to be supposed that Mr. Darcy would connect himself with a family where, to every other objection, would now be added an alliance and relationship of the nearest kind with a man whom he so justly scorned.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
12  Wholly inattentive to her sister's feelings, Lydia flew about the house in restless ecstasy, calling for everyone's congratulations, and laughing and talking with more violence than ever; whilst the luckless Kitty continued in the parlour repined at her fate in terms as unreasonable as her accent was peevish.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
13  'After mentioning the likelihood of this marriage to her ladyship last night, she immediately, with her usual condescension, expressed what she felt on the occasion; when it became apparent, that on the score of some family objections on the part of my cousin, she would never give her consent to what she termed so disgraceful a match.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 57
14  Mr. Collins was not a sensible man, and the deficiency of nature had been but little assisted by education or society; the greatest part of his life having been spent under the guidance of an illiterate and miserly father; and though he belonged to one of the universities, he had merely kept the necessary terms, without forming at it any useful acquaintance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
15  Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect or their nearer connection.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20