THOUGHT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - thought in Mansfield Park
1  I thought you would be struck.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
2  She did not seem to have a thought of fear.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
3  We both thought it would be a comfort to you.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
4  No; he only said he thought it very likely; and I thought so too.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
5  And now," added Mrs. Grant, "I have thought of something to make it complete.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
6  He thought of his own four children, of his two sons, of cousins in love, etc.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
7  Her store-room, she thought, might have been good enough for Mrs. Grant to go into.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
8  You could not be expected to have thought on the subject before; but when you do think of it, you must see the importance of getting in the grass.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
9  After all that I said to her as we came along, I thought she would have behaved better; I told her how much might depend upon her acquitting herself well at first.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
10  There was no positive ill-nature in Maria or Julia; and though Fanny was often mortified by their treatment of her, she thought too lowly of her own claims to feel injured by it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
11  She had two sisters to be benefited by her elevation; and such of their acquaintance as thought Miss Ward and Miss Frances quite as handsome as Miss Maria, did not scruple to predict their marrying with almost equal advantage.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
12  Fanny thought it a bold measure, but offered no further resistance; and they went together into the breakfast-room, where Edmund prepared her paper, and ruled her lines with all the goodwill that her brother could himself have felt, and probably with somewhat more exactness.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
13  As her appearance and spirits improved, Sir Thomas and Mrs. Norris thought with greater satisfaction of their benevolent plan; and it was pretty soon decided between them that, though far from clever, she showed a tractable disposition, and seemed likely to give them little trouble.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
14  As to her cousins' gaieties, she loved to hear an account of them, especially of the balls, and whom Edmund had danced with; but thought too lowly of her own situation to imagine she should ever be admitted to the same, and listened, therefore, without an idea of any nearer concern in them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
15  Fanny could read, work, and write, but she had been taught nothing more; and as her cousins found her ignorant of many things with which they had been long familiar, they thought her prodigiously stupid, and for the first two or three weeks were continually bringing some fresh report of it into the drawing-room.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
16  "If poor Sir Thomas were fated never to return, it would be peculiarly consoling to see their dear Maria well married," she very often thought; always when they were in the company of men of fortune, and particularly on the introduction of a young man who had recently succeeded to one of the largest estates and finest places in the country.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  As the horse continued in name, as well as fact, the property of Edmund, Mrs. Norris could tolerate its being for Fanny's use; and had Lady Bertram ever thought about her own objection again, he might have been excused in her eyes for not waiting till Sir Thomas's return in September, for when September came Sir Thomas was still abroad, and without any near prospect of finishing his business.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
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