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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - time in Mansfield Park
1  She had not time for such cares.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
2  Edmund was absent at this time, or the evil would have been earlier remedied.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
3  To be neglected before one's time must be very vexatious; but it was entirely the mother's fault.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
4  I cannot remember the time when I did not know a great deal that she has not the least notion of yet.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
5  Suppose her a pretty girl, and seen by Tom or Edmund for the first time seven years hence, and I dare say there would be mischief.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
6  The house was built in Elizabeth's time, and is a large, regular, brick building; heavy, but respectable looking, and has many good rooms.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
7  Mrs. Norris took possession of the White House, the Grants arrived at the Parsonage, and these events over, everything at Mansfield went on for some time as usual.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
8  Fanny Price was at this time just ten years old, and though there might not be much in her first appearance to captivate, there was, at least, nothing to disgust her relations.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
9  It required a longer time, however, than Mrs. Norris was inclined to allow, to reconcile Fanny to the novelty of Mansfield Park, and the separation from everybody she had been used to.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
10  She must try to find amusement in what was passing at the upper end of the table, and in observing Mr. Rushworth, who was now making his appearance at Mansfield for the first time since the Crawfords' arrival.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
11  I shall understand all your ways in time; but, coming down with the true London maxim, that everything is to be got with money, I was a little embarrassed at first by the sturdy independence of your country customs.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
12  He continued with her the whole time of her writing, to assist her with his penknife or his orthography, as either were wanted; and added to these attentions, which she felt very much, a kindness to her brother which delighted her beyond all the rest.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
13  She was sure Sir Thomas had never intended it: and she must say that, to be making such a purchase in his absence, and adding to the great expenses of his stable, at a time when a large part of his income was unsettled, seemed to her very unjustifiable.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
14  The necessity of the measure in a pecuniary light, and the hope of its utility to his son, reconciled Sir Thomas to the effort of quitting the rest of his family, and of leaving his daughters to the direction of others at their present most interesting time of life.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
15  Nobody loved plenty and hospitality more than herself; nobody more hated pitiful doings; the Parsonage, she believed, had never been wanting in comforts of any sort, had never borne a bad character in her time, but this was a way of going on that she could not understand.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
16  In the fullness of his belief that such a thing must be, he mentioned its probability to his wife; and the first time of the subject's occurring to her again happening to be when Fanny was present, she calmly observed to her, "So, Fanny, you are going to leave us, and live with my sister."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
17  From about the time of her entering the family, Lady Bertram, in consequence of a little ill-health, and a great deal of indolence, gave up the house in town, which she had been used to occupy every spring, and remained wholly in the country, leaving Sir Thomas to attend his duty in Parliament, with whatever increase or diminution of comfort might arise from her absence.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
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