TOLERABLE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - tolerable in Pride and Prejudice
1  Charlotte herself was tolerably composed.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
2  My mother is tolerably well, I trust; though her spirits are greatly shaken.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
3  It needed all Jane's steady mildness to bear these attacks with tolerable tranquillity.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
4  How Wickham and Lydia were to be supported in tolerable independence, she could not imagine.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
5  The dear Colonel rallied his spirits tolerably till just at last; but Darcy seemed to feel it most acutely, more, I think, than last year.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
6  Her teeth are tolerable, but not out of the common way; and as for her eyes, which have sometimes been called so fine, I could never see anything extraordinary in them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 45
7  Elizabeth's mind was now relieved from a very heavy weight; and, after half an hour's quiet reflection in her own room, she was able to join the others with tolerable composure.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 59
8  Sir William Lucas had been formerly in trade in Meryton, where he had made a tolerable fortune, and risen to the honour of knighthood by an address to the king during his mayoralty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
9  On the gentlemen's appearing, her colour increased; yet she received them with tolerable ease, and with a propriety of behaviour equally free from any symptom of resentment or any unnecessary complaisance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
10  But, though Bingley and Jane meet tolerably often, it is never for many hours together; and, as they always see each other in large mixed parties, it is impossible that every moment should be employed in conversing together.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
11  His behaviour to herself could now have had no tolerable motive; he had either been deceived with regard to her fortune, or had been gratifying his vanity by encouraging the preference which she believed she had most incautiously shown.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
12  But Elizabeth had now recollected herself, and making a strong effort for it, was able to assure with tolerable firmness that the prospect of their relationship was highly grateful to her, and that she wished her all imaginable happiness.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
13  When to these recollections was added the development of Wickham's character, it may be easily believed that the happy spirits which had seldom been depressed before, were now so much affected as to make it almost impossible for her to appear tolerably cheerful.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
14  She said no more, and they went down the other dance and parted in silence; and on each side dissatisfied, though not to an equal degree, for in Darcy's breast there was a tolerable powerful feeling towards her, which soon procured her pardon, and directed all his anger against another.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
15  Elizabeth passed the chief of the night in her sister's room, and in the morning had the pleasure of being able to send a tolerable answer to the inquiries which she very early received from Mr. Bingley by a housemaid, and some time afterwards from the two elegant ladies who waited on his sisters.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
16  The two gentlemen left Rosings the next morning, and Mr. Collins having been in waiting near the lodges, to make them his parting obeisance, was able to bring home the pleasing intelligence, of their appearing in very good health, and in as tolerable spirits as could be expected, after the melancholy scene so lately gone through at Rosings.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
17  In Darcy's presence she dared not mention Wickham's name; but Elizabeth instantly comprehended that he was uppermost in her thoughts; and the various recollections connected with him gave her a moment's distress; but exerting herself vigorously to repel the ill-natured attack, she presently answered the question in a tolerably detached tone.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 45
18  He was anxious to avoid the notice of his cousins, from a conviction that if they saw him depart, they could not fail to conjecture his design, and he was not willing to have the attempt known till its success might be known likewise; for though feeling almost secure, and with reason, for Charlotte had been tolerably encouraging, he was comparatively diffident since the adventure of Wednesday.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
19  Her character will be fixed, and she will, at sixteen, be the most determined flirt that ever made herself or her family ridiculous; a flirt, too, in the worst and meanest degree of flirtation; without any attraction beyond youth and a tolerable person; and, from the ignorance and emptiness of her mind, wholly unable to ward off any portion of that universal contempt which her rage for admiration will excite.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
20  This part of his intelligence, though unheard by Lydia, was caught by Elizabeth, and, as it assured her that Darcy was not less answerable for Wickham's absence than if her first surmise had been just, every feeling of displeasure against the former was so sharpened by immediate disappointment, that she could hardly reply with tolerable civility to the polite inquiries which he directly afterwards approached to make.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18