TROUBLE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Odyssey by Homer
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 Current Search - trouble in The Odyssey
1  Do not trouble Laertes: he has trouble enough already.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK IV
2  I have trouble enough of my own, and cannot be burdened with other people.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XVII
3  He will be giving us trouble presently; may Jove take him before he is full grown.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK IV
4  Ulysses in his turn told her what he had suffered, and how much trouble he had himself given to other people.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XXIII
5  He is evidently in great trouble, so let the bard leave off, that we may all enjoy ourselves, hosts and guest alike.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VIII
6  Ulysses answered, "Take heart and do not trouble yourself about that, but let us go into the house hard by your garden."
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XXIV
7  It is all over now; still, if you look at the straw you can see what the ear was, for I have had trouble enough and to spare.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XIV
8  Then he said to Ulysses, "Old man, the dogs were likely to have made short work of you, and then you would have got me into trouble."
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XIV
9  Eumaeus, and all of you, to-morrow I want to go away and begin begging about the town, so as to be no more trouble to you or to your men.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XV
10  To this Eurymachus son of Polybus answered, "Take heart, Queen Penelope daughter of Icarius, and do not trouble yourself about these matters."
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XVI
11  I am in great trouble, yet it insists that I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrows and dwell only on the due replenishing of itself.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
12  Take heart, and do not trouble yourself about that," rejoined Minerva, "let us rather set about stowing your things at once in the cave, where they will be quite safe.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XIII
13  The suitors in the covered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards his neighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, bad luck to him, for all the trouble he gives us."
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XVIII
14  Therefore, I am suppliant at your knees if haply you may tell me about my father's melancholy end, whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some other traveller; for he was a man born to trouble.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK IV
15  Therefore I am suppliant at your knees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end, whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some other traveller, for he was a man born to trouble.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK III
16  A man knows neither ache nor pain if he gets hit while fighting for his money, or for his sheep or his cattle; and even so Antinous has hit me while in the service of my miserable belly, which is always getting people into trouble.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XVII
17  And I said, 'Achilles, son of Peleus, foremost champion of the Achaeans, I came to consult Teiresias, and see if he could advise me about my return home to Ithaca, for I have never yet been able to get near the Achaean land, nor to set foot in my own country, but have been in trouble all the time.'
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XI
18  Ulysses answered, "I hope you may be as dear to the gods as you are to me, for having saved me from going about and getting into trouble; there is nothing worse than being always on the tramp; still, when men have once got low down in the world they will go through a great deal on behalf of their miserable bellies."
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK XV
19  To-morrow morning I shall invite a still larger number of aldermen, and will give a sacrificial banquet in honour of our guest; we can then discuss the question of his escort, and consider how we may at once send him back rejoicing to his own country without trouble or inconvenience to himself, no matter how distant it may be.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
20  Nevertheless there was still much trouble in store for me, for at this point Neptune would let me go no further, and raised a great storm against me; the sea was so terribly high that I could no longer keep to my raft, which went to pieces under the fury of the gale, and I had to swim for it, till wind and current brought me to your shores.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII