VERY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - very in Mansfield Park
1  Her feelings were very acute, and too little understood to be properly attended to.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
2  "This is not a very promising beginning," said Mrs. Norris, when Fanny had left the room.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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3  It was the natural result of the conduct of each party, and such as a very imprudent marriage almost always produces.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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4  But Miss Frances married, in the common phrase, to disoblige her family, and by fixing on a lieutenant of marines, without education, fortune, or connexions, did it very thoroughly.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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5  I should wish to see them very good friends, and would, on no account, authorise in my girls the smallest degree of arrogance towards their relation; but still they cannot be equals.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
6  The very idea of her having been suffered to grow up at a distance from us all in poverty and neglect, would be enough to make either of the dear, sweet-tempered boys in love with her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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7  I dare say she would not; but she would be introduced into the society of this country under such very favourable circumstances as, in all human probability, would get her a creditable establishment.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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8  You are sorry to leave Mama, my dear little Fanny," said he, "which shows you to be a very good girl; but you must remember that you are with relations and friends, who all love you, and wish to make you happy.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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9  He continued with her the whole time of her writing, to assist her with his penknife or his orthography, as either were wanted; and added to these attentions, which she felt very much, a kindness to her brother which delighted her beyond all the rest.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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10  We shall probably see much to wish altered in her, and must prepare ourselves for gross ignorance, some meanness of opinions, and very distressing vulgarity of manner; but these are not incurable faults; nor, I trust, can they be dangerous for her associates.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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11  Miss Ward's match, indeed, when it came to the point, was not contemptible: Sir Thomas being happily able to give his friend an income in the living of Mansfield; and Mr. and Mrs. Norris began their career of conjugal felicity with very little less than a thousand a year.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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12  Mrs. Price seemed rather surprised that a girl should be fixed on, when she had so many fine boys, but accepted the offer most thankfully, assuring them of her daughter's being a very well-disposed, good-humoured girl, and trusting they would never have cause to throw her off.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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13  The little rusticities and awkwardnesses which had at first made grievous inroads on the tranquillity of all, and not least of herself, necessarily wore away, and she was no longer materially afraid to appear before her uncle, nor did her aunt Norris's voice make her start very much.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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14  The young people were all at home, and sustained their share in the introduction very well, with much good humour, and no embarrassment, at least on the part of the sons, who, at seventeen and sixteen, and tall of their age, had all the grandeur of men in the eyes of their little cousin.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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15  Mrs. Price, in her turn, was injured and angry; and an answer, which comprehended each sister in its bitterness, and bestowed such very disrespectful reflections on the pride of Sir Thomas as Mrs. Norris could not possibly keep to herself, put an end to all intercourse between them for a considerable period.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
16  Having married on a narrower income than she had been used to look forward to, she had, from the first, fancied a very strict line of economy necessary; and what was begun as a matter of prudence, soon grew into a matter of choice, as an object of that needful solicitude which there were no children to supply.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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17  They were a remarkably fine family, the sons very well-looking, the daughters decidedly handsome, and all of them well-grown and forward of their age, which produced as striking a difference between the cousins in person, as education had given to their address; and no one would have supposed the girls so nearly of an age as they really were.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
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