VIRTUE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - virtue in Pride and Prejudice
1  It has connected him nearer with virtue than with any other feeling.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
2  His countenance, voice, and manner had established him at once in the possession of every virtue.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
3  It does seem, and it is most shocking indeed," replied Elizabeth, with tears in her eyes, "that a sister's sense of decency and virtue in such a point should admit of doubt.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
4  But how little of permanent happiness could belong to a couple who were only brought together because their passions were stronger than their virtue, she could easily conjecture.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
5  She had heard nothing of Lady Catherine that spoke her awful from any extraordinary talents or miraculous virtue, and the mere stateliness of money or rank she thought she could witness without trepidation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
6  For such an attachment as this she might have sufficient charms; and though she did not suppose Lydia to be deliberately engaging in an elopement without the intention of marriage, she had no difficulty in believing that neither her virtue nor her understanding would preserve her from falling an easy prey.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
7  She tried to recollect some instance of goodness, some distinguished trait of integrity or benevolence, that might rescue him from the attacks of Mr. Darcy; or at least, by the predominance of virtue, atone for those casual errors under which she would endeavour to class what Mr. Darcy had described as the idleness and vice of many years' continuance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36