WALK in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - walk in Pride and Prejudice
1  This walk is not wide enough for our party.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
2  No, indeed, I do not wish to avoid the walk.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
3  We dine at Rosings twice every week, and are never allowed to walk home.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
4  At that moment they were met from another walk by Mrs. Hurst and Elizabeth herself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
5  Then taking the disengaged arm of Mr. Darcy, she left Elizabeth to walk by herself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
6  You have a sweet room here, Mr. Bingley, and a charming prospect over the gravel walk.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
7  As the weather was fine, they had a pleasant walk of about half a mile across the park.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
8  Within a short walk of Longbourn lived a family with whom the Bennets were particularly intimate.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
9  "I did not know that you intended to walk," said Miss Bingley, in some confusion, lest they had been overheard.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
10  He made no answer, and they were again silent till they had gone down the dance, when he asked her if she and her sisters did not very often walk to Meryton.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
11  Mr. Collins and Charlotte appeared at the door, and the carriage stopped at the small gate which led by a short gravel walk to the house, amidst the nods and smiles of the whole party.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
12  Here, leading the way through every walk and cross walk, and scarcely allowing them an interval to utter the praises he asked for, every view was pointed out with a minuteness which left beauty entirely behind.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
13  He was directly invited to join their party, but he declined it, observing that he could imagine but two motives for their choosing to walk up and down the room together, with either of which motives his joining them would interfere.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
14  About the middle of the next day, as she was in her room getting ready for a walk, a sudden noise below seemed to speak the whole house in confusion; and, after listening a moment, she heard somebody running up stairs in a violent hurry, and calling loudly after her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
15  She highly approved his forbearance, and they had leisure for a full discussion of it, and for all the commendation which they civilly bestowed on each other, as Wickham and another officer walked back with them to Longbourn, and during the walk he particularly attended to her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
16  Very few days passed in which Mr. Collins did not walk to Rosings, and not many in which his wife did not think it necessary to go likewise; and till Elizabeth recollected that there might be other family livings to be disposed of, she could not understand the sacrifice of so many hours.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
17  In Meryton they parted; the two youngest repaired to the lodgings of one of the officers' wives, and Elizabeth continued her walk alone, crossing field after field at a quick pace, jumping over stiles and springing over puddles with impatient activity, and finding herself at last within view of the house, with weary ankles, dirty stockings, and a face glowing with the warmth of exercise.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
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