WALKING in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - walking in Pride and Prejudice
1  Her father was walking about the room, looking grave and anxious.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 59
2  Mr. Darcy walked off; and Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feelings toward him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
3  Mrs. Gardiner, who was walking arm-in-arm with Elizabeth, gave her a look expressive of wonder.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
4  Mrs. Bennet was not in the habit of walking; Mary could never spare time; but the remaining five set off together.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 58
5  Mr. Darcy handed the ladies into the carriage; and when it drove off, Elizabeth saw him walking slowly towards the house.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
6  He seemed scarcely to hear her, and was walking up and down the room in earnest meditation, his brow contracted, his air gloomy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
7  After walking two or three times along that part of the lane, she was tempted, by the pleasantness of the morning, to stop at the gates and look into the park.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
8  Elizabeth, feeling really anxious, was determined to go to her, though the carriage was not to be had; and as she was no horsewoman, walking was her only alternative.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
9  After walking several miles in a leisurely manner, and too busy to know anything about it, they found at last, on examining their watches, that it was time to be at home.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 58
10  But the attention of every lady was soon caught by a young man, whom they had never seen before, of most gentlemanlike appearance, walking with another officer on the other side of the way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
11  He had by that time reached it also, and, holding out a letter, which she instinctively took, said, with a look of haughty composure, "I have been walking in the grove some time in the hope of meeting you."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
12  That she should have walked three miles so early in the day, in such dirty weather, and by herself, was almost incredible to Mrs. Hurst and Miss Bingley; and Elizabeth was convinced that they held her in contempt for it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
13  The gentlemen arrived early; and, before Mrs. Bennet had time to tell him of their having seen his aunt, of which her daughter sat in momentary dread, Bingley, who wanted to be alone with Jane, proposed their all walking out.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 58
14  After walking some time in this way, the two ladies in front, the two gentlemen behind, on resuming their places, after descending to the brink of the river for the better inspection of some curious water-plant, there chanced to be a little alteration.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
15  They had been walking about the place with some of their new friends, and were just returning to the inn to dress themselves for dining with the same family, when the sound of a carriage drew them to a window, and they saw a gentleman and a lady in a curricle driving up the street.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44
16  I hope," said she, as they were walking together in the shrubbery the next day, "you will give your mother-in-law a few hints, when this desirable event takes place, as to the advantage of holding her tongue; and if you can compass it, do cure the younger girls of running after officers.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
17  If there had not been a Netherfield ball to prepare for and talk of, the younger Miss Bennets would have been in a very pitiable state at this time, for from the day of the invitation, to the day of the ball, there was such a succession of rain as prevented their walking to Meryton once.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
18  His arrival was soon known at the Parsonage; for Mr. Collins was walking the whole morning within view of the lodges opening into Hunsford Lane, in order to have the earliest assurance of it, and after making his bow as the carriage turned into the Park, hurried home with the great intelligence.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
19  Within doors there was Lady Catherine, books, and a billiard-table, but gentlemen cannot always be within doors; and in the nearness of the Parsonage, or the pleasantness of the walk to it, or of the people who lived in it, the two cousins found a temptation from this period of walking thither almost every day.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 32
20  Elizabeth passed quietly out of the room, Jane and Kitty followed, but Lydia stood her ground, determined to hear all she could; and Charlotte, detained first by the civility of Mr. Collins, whose inquiries after herself and all her family were very minute, and then by a little curiosity, satisfied herself with walking to the window and pretending not to hear.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20