WANT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - want in Pride and Prejudice
1  There was no want of discourse.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 51
2  There is one point on which I want your advice.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 40
3  "And Lydia used to want to go to London," added Kitty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
4  I am more likely to want more time than courage, Elizabeth.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 60
5  I only want to think you perfect, and you set yourself against it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
6  But in matters of greater weight, I may suffer from want of money.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
7  He is nothing to us, you know, and I am sure I never want to see him again.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
8  I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be no want of subject.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
9  It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
10  I want to know," said she, with a countenance no less smiling than her sister's, "what you have learnt about Mr. Wickham.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
11  Do not involve yourself or endeavour to involve him in an affection which the want of fortune would make so very imprudent.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
12  It was owing to him, to his reserve and want of proper consideration, that Wickham's character had been so misunderstood, and consequently that he had been received and noticed as he was.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
13  She then sat still five minutes longer; but unable to waste such a precious occasion, she suddenly got up, and saying to Kitty, "Come here, my love, I want to speak to you," took her out of the room.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 55
14  She was more alive to the disgrace which her want of new clothes must reflect on her daughter's nuptials, than to any sense of shame at her eloping and living with Wickham a fortnight before they took place.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
15  My objections to the marriage were not merely those which I last night acknowledged to have the utmost force of passion to put aside, in my own case; the want of connection could not be so great an evil to my friend as to me.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
16  The situation of your mother's family, though objectionable, was nothing in comparison to that total want of propriety so frequently, so almost uniformly betrayed by herself, by your three younger sisters, and occasionally even by your father.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
17  Her father had most cruelly mortified her, by what he said of Mr. Darcy's indifference, and she could do nothing but wonder at such a want of penetration, or fear that perhaps, instead of his seeing too little, she might have fancied too much.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 57
18  Without thinking highly either of men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
19  Miss Bingley offered her the carriage, and she only wanted a little pressing to accept it, when Jane testified such concern in parting with her, that Miss Bingley was obliged to convert the offer of the chaise to an invitation to remain at Netherfield for the present.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
20  But in all, and in almost every line of each, there was a want of that cheerfulness which had been used to characterise her style, and which, proceeding from the serenity of a mind at ease with itself and kindly disposed towards everyone, had been scarcely ever clouded.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34